Apple’s latest video on YouTube highlights iPhone 7’s Memories

Apple's latest video on YouTube highlights iPhone 7's Memories

The videos created by ‘Memories’ collects pictures and videos from camera roll based on their location, time and content. It automatically comes up with videos that can be located in the camera roll.

The feature is not one of the technological innovations the world has not seen. As a matter of fact Google Photos has the exactly same feature. However, the video is very creative in all its true sense and Apple sure wants to strum the right chords in viewers hearts to generate sales for iPhone 7. Apple has posted yet another video that guides viewers to the Memories feature.

All you need to do is open the photos app, locate memories tab at the bottom and click on it. A series of videos appears on the screen which one can play by simply clicking on any of it. Iphone 7 will soon be replaced by iPhone 7s and iPhone 8 variants. The smartphone has already seen a decline in sales in the second quarter of 2017 which will further drop once the latest iPhones take over.

Iphone 7 which is the most iconic smartphone from Apple in the matter of innovative technology has several features that no other smartphone manufacturer has yet come up with. The dual camera on iPhone redefined smartphone photography. OnePlus 5 also has a similar feature but Apple’s exceptional quality is hard to beat even for OnePlus.

 

[“source-gizbot”]

Apple just held an internal seminar to stop leaks

Apple just held an internal seminar to stop leaks

For example, lately, the rumor mill has been quite active with the upcoming iPhone 8. we know that the device is expected to come with almost bezel-less display and rear dual cameras.

Since the iPhone 8 is going to be the 10th anniversary model of the iPhone, it is really important for Apple that it stays behind the curtain. So with an aim to put an end to all the leaks, the Cupertino-giant recently held an hour long internal meeting. Ironically, it has been leaked as well. A publication named TheOutline has posted a recording of the seminar, which was called “Stopping Leakers – Keeping Confidential at Apple.”

The discussion was led by a trio of employees from the company’s General Security Division. The seminar saw faces like the director of Global Security, David Rice, Lee Freedman, Apple’s director of worldwide investigations, and Jenny Hubbert from the Global Security communications and training team. The seminar focused on how the company plans to stop the flow of information to competitors, counterfeiters and the press. According to the Apple CEO Tim Cook, these leaked information affects their sales to a great extent.

He says that some of the potential buyers of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus are not opting for the current models after hearing about the exciting specs line up of the upcoming iPhone 8. While Apple is taking actions to reduce the leaks, we don’t expect the leaks to stop immediately.

 

[“source-gizbot”]

Apple Leak ‘Confirms’ iPhone 8 Is Massive

Supersized smartphones is clearly the trend of 2017: massive new displays crammed inside phones with super skinny bezels. And the iPhone 8 looks set to make the biggest leap of them all…

Following multiple design leaks and cases sent to me from third parties, new information from Weibo (via Slashleaks) again illustrates exactly how Apple AAPL -1.43% will radically enlarge the iPhone in 2017.

iPhone 8 design with enlarged display based on leaked leaks. Image credit: iDrop News

iDrop News

iPhone 8 concept with massive new display based on multiple leaks. Image credit: iDrop News

As you see below the new leaked protective panels (like leak after leak in recent weeks) perfectly matches renders, schematics and third party cases – some of which are already on sale showing the level of confidence Apple’s peripheral partners have.

iPhone 8 leaks continue to consistently match leaked cases, schematics and renders

Weibo

iPhone 8 leaks continue to consistently match leaked cases, schematics and renders. Image credit: Weibo

And what all these cases, images and schematics show is a dramatic shift from the 4.7-inch iPhone 7 to a 5.8-inch iPhone 8. This 1.1-inch increase is larger even than Samsung’s jump from 2016’s Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge to the new ‘Infinity Displays’ on the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus.

That said it is expected iPhone 8 users will lose some of this extra space to a new ‘Function Area’, a bottom notification and shortcut area in iOS 11 which will replace the home button and space lost to the ‘cut-out’ on the top bezel which houses the front facing camera and sensors. Regardless it is a dramatic size increase.

Concept of the iOS 11 'function area' for the iPhone 8 which is expected to be used for contextual controls and notifications. Image credit: iDrop News

iDrop News

Concept of the iOS 11 ‘function area’ for the iPhone 8 which is expected to be used for contextual controls and notifications. Image credit: iDrop News

Needless to say, sceptics will (perhaps correctly) point out it is only when Tim Cook holds the iPhone 8 aloft at its official unveiling that we can know these changes are 100% real. But I think we’re fast approaching a level of consistency and certainty (especially combined with the historical accuracy of leaks in recent years) where we can say this is what the new iPhone will look like.

In fact I’m calling it: this is what the new iPhone will look like.

iPhone 8 leaked schematic again matches perfectly. Image credit: Benjamin Geskin
[Source”indianexpress”]

It very much depends

Apple has released its iOS 11 beta to the public. That means everyone can get hold of the new software, months before it’s released – but there’s a big catch.

Because the iPhone and iPad operating system isn’t actually finished yet, it’s full of plenty of bugs as well as not being as refined as it will be when it’s officially unveiled. That means that using it comes with a huge warning: it might stop working properly at any time, and you can’t really complain about it if it does.

With that out of the way, it’s worth getting to what iOS 11 does actually give you. The new update – which brings probably the biggest changes ever made to the iPad, and some pretty major ones to the iPhone too – was unveiled at WWDC earlier this month.

It brings proper multitasking to the iPad, allowing people to easily do more than one thing at once and making the tablet into a proper, productivity-focused computer. It updates almost all of Apple’s apps, bringing social features to Apple Music and document scanning to Notes, for instance.

And it changes the way the camera works in a major way, adding new ways of taking and editing photos. That comes alongside support for ARKit – Apple’s new technology built to make it easier for people to create apps that use augmented reality.

But the big question is whether you should start using it now, or wait until it’s officially released, probably in September.

The main thing you need to ask yourself is how much you rely on your device. If you need to make sure that it is always ready to respond for work, for instance, then don’t update to the beta: though bugs are rare within the software, they do have an annoying tendency to pop up exactly when you need to write an important email.

You might also found that apps haven’t been updated to work with the new software, and so might not work at all. You won’t know that until you upgrade – so if there is anything you rely on a lot, it’s also worth skipping this update.

Equally, if you don’t rely really on your device – if you have an iPad that you use only some of the time for reading or watching TV, for instance – then you should think about giving it a try.

In fact, the iPad is the perfect place to try the new update out on. Most of the biggest updates that iOS 11 brings are on the tablet – meaning that as well as being a less risky device to try it out on, you also get to experience the full joy of the new features.

Prime among those is multitasking, which also brings with it a redesigned home screen and way of using features like drag and drop. Those are explained to you when you first fire up iOS 11 on your iPad.

The problem is also that those new multitasking features also use up a lot of processing power – important, when the tablet is also trying to handle an operating system that doesn’t make use of the processing power in the most efficient way.

So if you do depend on your iPad for work, for instance, it’s probably best holding off for now. But if you can put up with it stuttering and becoming confused sometimes, then you’ll get the most out of putting it on there.

On the other hand, the upgrades to the iPhone are relatively few, though there’s still plenty of significant new features. While the updates to Siri, Apple Music, Messages, Maps and more are all fun, they’re relatively minor for the time being – while that means you’re less likely to run into problems, it also means that you’ll get a lot less out of taking the risk and diving into the new software straight away.

[Source”cnbc”]

Apple’s AR is closer to reality than Google’s

Apple has often been accused of acting like it invented things that others have been doing for years. That complaint is not without merit, however Apple can lay claim to transforming existing things into mainstream successes, which takes no small amount of invention in its own right. Fingerprint authentication and contactless payments are just two recent examples, having both existed in Japan and on niche devices for over a decade before Apple raised them to global prominence with the iPhone.

Next up on Apple’s agenda is augmented reality, the act of superimposing digital data and visuals atop a live video feed of your surroundings — something that Google, Microsoft, and many others have been experimenting with for a long time. Apple is far from being able to claim it invented AR, but its new ARKit in iOS 11 is already showing signs to suggest that Apple will help bring AR into the mainstream faster and better than anyone else.

The chronic problem with augmented reality has always been one of practicality. You could have the most basic forms of AR on your regular phone, as provided by apps like Layar, which has been around since 2009, but those have never been particularly compelling. Or you could have more sophisticated and appealing augmentations, as presented by Google’s Tango project, but you’d need a big fat phablet to lug around to make them happen. Apple’s difference is to combine the convenience of your daily phone with the appeal of advanced AR.

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Made With ARKit @madewithARKit

Measure distances with your iPhone. Just because you can. Clever little #ARKit app by @BalestraPatrick ‍♂️ http://bit.ly/2sFl8RB 

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Looking at this distance-measuring app, it seems so simple and obvious. Of course your super-powered, multi-core phone should be smart enough to measure out basic distances, and there have indeed been many wonky apps trying to do that in the past. But measuring with AR, as already shown off by Google Tango phones, allows you a much more intuitive method for doing it. Having the phone actually aware of the three-dimensional space in its view allows for precise measurements, which can be represented with a neat hologram of a measuring tape. Apple’s advantage in the contest for doing this best is simple: while Google Tango demands special hardware, ARKit requires only that you have a recent iOS device. At WWDC earlier this month, Craig Federighi described ARKit as “the largest AR platform in the world,” and he was right.

Apple’s AR will immediately reach millions of people who already have the requisite hardware. And while it looks to be functionally as flexible and capable as Google’s Tango (check out some early examples of fanciful experiments with ARKit), its broader audience makes it much more enticing for serious developers to invest their time and money into. Google’s Tango is about the future whereas Apple’s ARKit is about the present.

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Made With ARKit @madewithARKit

BOOM And just like that we have #ARKit measurement app number 2 http://bit.ly/2sbaNta  → by @laanlabs

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Considering how little time it took to develop two convincingly accurate AR measuring apps with the iOS 11 beta, and reading the comments from their makers, Apple also appears to have an advantage in the ease of development with ARKit. It’s exciting to think that there are still three months before the release of the next iPhone and the accompanying finalization of iOS 11, by which time Apple’s big-budget app developer partners are likely to have a deluge of AR-enabled apps for people to play with. That’s how stuff goes mainstream: as a big wave of change that touches everyone from casual Pokémon Go players to serious home DIY geeks figuring out how to arrange their living room furniture.

For the people who don’t care about incremental changes in phone specs or design, the differentiator between devices has always been in the unique things that each one can do — or, failing that, the convenience and ease of use of common features. Apple’s iPhone is more convenient than Google’s Project Tango devices and with iOS 11 it’ll have much better AR capabilities than its nearest premium Android rivals. So if we’re looking for the AR innovator that will take the technology into the mainstream, Apple once again looks like the likeliest suspect.

[Source”GSmerena”]

 

Apple’s Week Centered on Tim Cook and Qualcomm

Story image for Apple from Fortune

In a first in quite some time, Apple suffered from a rather troubled week.

Over the past several days, Apple was forced to deal with some problems. The company has been quietly scrubbing the App Store of what has been called “hundreds of thousands” of apps that are delivering little to no value to users. Additionally, the company’s fight with chipmaker Qualcomm intensified this week. And Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, watched his employee approval rating fall. But in a bit of bittersweet news for Apple, the company’s e-book troubles are being put to rest.

Overall, it wasn’t the best of weeks for Apple (AAPL, +0.45%). But even so, there are no signs of business troubles in Cupertino, so it wasn’t all bad.

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Here’s our look at the biggest Apple news from the past week:

This is Fortune’s weekly roundup of the biggest Apple news this week. To see last week’s roundup, click here.

  1. Apple CEO Tim Cook’s employee ranking is down for 2017. In a new study from Glassdoor, Cook took the 53rd slot in a ranking of the world’s top CEOs by employee opinion. Cook earned a 93% approval rating in the study. That’s down from a 96% approval rating last year, when he took the eighth spot in the study. Glassdoor didn’t say why Cook’s approval rating fell year over year, but he’s still far ahead of most chief executives: the average CEO approval rating is 67%.
  2. Apple opened a new front in its battle against Qualcomm this week, saying the chip-maker shouldn’t get a cut on every iPhone it sells. Qualcomm has argued that it should get a license on each iPhone sold, and has been accused by Apple of withholding $1 billion in rebates. The companies are battling the case in a U.S. federal court.
  3. Good news if you have an Apple e-book credit: you can cash it in. Bad news if you have an Apple e-book credit: you have practically no time to do it. Those who are eligible for a credit received emails this week informing them that they would need to cash in their rebates by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. PT. That means you have just hours to get your credit. The credit is the result of Apple’s protracted battle over alleged e-book price-fixing between 2010 and 2012. Apple was ordered last year to pay $400 million in refunds to those affected by its e-book pricing.
  4. If you’re looking to save a few bucks on Apple Music, it’s now possible. Apple has quietly added an annual Apple Music subscription to the service for $99. That’s a $21 savings on the standard $9.99-a-month option. It’s a bit buried, however, so click here to find out how to access the annual Apple Music subscription.
  5. Apple has been quietly removing “hundreds of thousands” of useless apps from its App Store over the past year, according to TechCrunch. Apple has also updated its App Store guidelines to ban apps that use a “commercialized template or app generation service.” The move could reduce the chances of spam or scam apps making their way into the App Store.

One more thing… An unidentified bidder this week bought an original—and working—Apple I computer for $355,500 at a Christie’s New York

[Source”pcworld”]

Chicago’s new Apple store has a giant MacBook for a roof

Construction is underway at the new Apple store in downtown Chicago, and today, as reported by DNA Chicago, a new design element was added — a giant Apple logo. A construction crew laid out the logo on the store’s silver, rectangular roof, making it look like a giant MacBook. It stayed for less than an hour before crews rolled up the logo and removed it.

Designed by London-based Foster+Partners, the store is a relocation of Apple’s original Chicago flagship and is a 20,000-square-foot space which, upon completion, will have all-glass walls and a thin, carbon fiber roof… that looks like a MacBook.

The first renderings were originally unveiled in 2015, and touted the project’s “echo” to Prairie Style homes. As the Chicago Tribune details, the all-glass walls range between 14 to 32 feet in height, and are made out of four layers of half-inch thick glass joined with layers of stronger, thicker laminated glass.

[Source”pcworld”]

Apple’s anti-leaking strategy just leaked

Apple wages a constant war on leakers designed to ensure it can unveil new products on its own terms. But the leaks never seem to stop, and it’s evident they won’t anytime soon.

The Outline’s William Turton obtained a leaked recording of an Apple presentation on Apple’s anti-leaking efforts, hilariously highlighting how difficult it can be to stop leaks.

The presentation reveals the elaborate steps Apple takes to safeguard the secrecy of its products. Apple has recruited a large team of anti-leak investigators, including people who previously worked at the National Security Agency, the FBI, and the Secret Service. One investigation lasted for three years.

“These investigations go on a long time,” Lee Freedman, who was an assistant US attorney before leading Apple’s investigation team, said in the recording. “We don’t take a defeatist mentality and say, ‘Oh well, it’s going to leak anyways.’” In one case, Apple pursued a case for three years before identifying the leaker.

One of Apple’s big challenges has been leaks from manufacturing facilities in China. To prevent these leaks, Apple requires Chinese workers to be searched as they enter and leave factories where Apple products are made. In the recording, an Apple official bragged that Apple screens more people than the TSA: “Their peak volume is 1.8 million a day. Ours, for just 40 factories in China, is 2.7 million a day.”

Apple has less draconian, but still extensive, security procedures at its American campuses.

Apple’s brass believes that all this secrecy helps the company’s bottom line. Early leaks of a forthcoming product could discourage customers from buying Apple products that are already on store shelves. And the surprise of a big Apple product reveal makes news organizations more likely to cover it.

At the same time, it’s hard to be sure if any of this really matters. Apple loyalists are going to buy a new Apple product sooner or later. And Apple is such a prominent brand that there’s little risk of customers not hearing about a new Apple product

[Source”pcworld”]

Apple may eventually launch ‘iGlass’ smart glasses for augmented reality, UBS speculates

Tim Cook, CEO, speaks during Apple's annual world wide developer conference (WWDC) in San Jose, California, U.S. June 5, 2017.

Apple may leverage augmented reality on the iPhone to help pave the way for a future smart glasses product, UBS said in a note to investors Tuesday.

Apple recently launched its ARKit developer tools, which will allow its partners to build new augmented reality applications for millions of iPhones already in the hands of consumers. It will give Apple an overnight leg up on companies like Google that are participating in the space on a much smaller scale.

Apple hasn’t participated in the smart glasses space yet, but the idea is that a user will be able to wear a special pair of glasses that overlays computer images over the real world. You might learn more about a restaurant, perhaps view its menu, by standing in front of it, for example.

Right now, companies like Apple and Google would be forced to create bulky glasses that wouldn’t be feasible or comfortable to wear. UBS believes Apple could use AR-ready iPhones to power the experience.

“Advanced sensors and camera capabilities will enhance the iPhone; eventually there could be independent hardware offerings, perhaps iGlass,” UBS analyst Steven Milunovich said. “We can imagine a pair of glasses with quintessential Apple design (iGlass), which enable a Hololens-type experience,” the company said, referring to Microsoft’s bulky alternative.

“However, the amount of compute power and sensors required likely pose a serious design challenge. If Apple could find a way to send massive amounts of data from the eyeglasses to the iPhone where the bulk of the compute would occur, the eyewear could have a more attractive design. The issue then becomes how to transfer massive amounts of complex data between devices quickly.”

Milunovich laid out 10 AR use cases ranging from games and entertainment to home improvement and health care/medical diagnostics. It said AR will help Apple retain iPhone users.

 [Source”timesofindia”]

Apple just created, and killed, a generation of AR businesses

Two weeks ago, Apple introduced ARKit, its solution for placing 3D objects realistically into a ‘real’ place. Basically, augmented reality.

And it just so happens that the Holy Grail of the home decor and architecture game has been, for years, being able to place decor and furniture inside a customer’s actual space. Over the past decade, as mobile has taken off, that dream has been transferred from the desktop web browser to phones and tablets.

A couple of factors have lined up to allow this category to explode and become, I believe, one of the first big breakout uses of AR in the App Store.

  • First, these kinds of apps need a huge library of 3D models of furniture and accessories. Whole companies were born in the early days that just offered to scan and import these for big companies.
  • The tech that allowed them to accurately perform SLAM (Simultaneous Location And Mapping) calculations in real time is far from trivial. Placing objects into a world required people to build the tech from the ground up by creating models of the rooms as well as the objects themselves.

Both of these points are now moot.

I can’t tell you how many of these kinds of companies I’ve seen over the years. Some of them were not bad at all, some were terrible, all were pretty much held back by the technology it took to map a room and place objects. I’ve written extensively about how Apple’s purchases over the last few years have gotten them to a place where they’re able to pack this into a phone — you can read that here.

The best recent stab I’ve seen at this model is called Modsy. It’s a pretty impressive process that has you take a few smartphone pictures that it stitches together and dresses up on its side, delivering you a fully decorated room a couple of days later. But that’s still far from real-time. ARKit is.

Modsy

 

So now here we are, with the ability for just about anyone to spin up an AR window inside their app. I predict that we’re going to see some real crap over the next few weeks and months as people just “put an AR on it.” But aside from that, we’re going to see a plug unstoppered on industries that needed a reliable version of this kind of AR portal in order to execute on a vision.

IKEA has announced that it is going to be allowing people to see their particular brand of lasts-just-long-enough furniture set into place in their own homes. IKEA won’t be the last though, by far.

It was even pointed out to me on Twitter that Apple probably just sherlocked the Pair app (a 500 Startups alum that we covered last August, incidentally) that was part of its inaugural Planet of the Apps episode.

The years and years of attempts at this, along with the technical pipeline of the modern online retail experience, has led most big furniture and accessory (and fashion btw) distributors to have all of their products modeled. Either from the original designs (all done in 3D now anyway) or scanned afterwards. Most catalog shots and online images are snapshots of what is technically, at the least, a 360 degree model of an object.

This means that there is a big pent up demand and a reservoir of available material to populate AR worlds. Thousands, hundreds of thousands — probably millions of 3D models of real stuff.

And we’ve now removed what was the biggest technical hurdle by divorcing the “room model” from the “object model.” Apple democratized AR to the tune of hundreds of millions of available portals — but it also did it to the tune of billions of points of interest. Every physical “node” of the world is now a potential layering aspect for AR.

Matthew Panzarino

@panzer

Every major furniture distributor already has 3D models of their products. This is gonna spread like wildfire. https://9to5mac.com/2017/06/19/ios-11-apple-ar-augmented-reality-ikea-app/ 

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Mike Rundle

@flyosity

@panzer So Apple is about to Sherlock the Planet of the Apps dude who said his app was more important than his kids lolol

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This is just a curiosity when it comes to individual experiences, but the potential is ridiculous when you start thinking about it in a persistent way.

So if everyone can do it then the value is diminished, right? Not really. This should just allow designers and developers to move up the stack. Now they’re no longer burdened with adapting an existing AR system to their needs or (shudder) manufacturing them from scratch. The focus can be purely on big idea thinking about how to apply AR, the experience of doing so, and how best to conjoin it with other systems like voice, mapping and photography.

Apple just built the AR industry’s shovel. Now all you have to do is decide where to dig.

The initial wave of AR stuff will be right along the lines of what I discussed above. Furniture placed in the real world to see how it looks; filter; fun tricks; games. After that, we’re going to see some really insane stuff as people see what it means

[Source”GSmerena”]