NOT YOUR REGULAR KIND OF GAMING MOD!

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I’m telling you, we may have accidentally (we’re not sorry) triggered a modularity revolution! There’s absolutely no shortage of modular concepts and if nothing, we’ve seen more than a fair share in the past few weeks (take for example this modular microphone concept, or these modular shoes that we love, or even this DIY modular smartphone).

The EXEO is the next in the series of “things made modular”. This series of concept controllers for console gaming are designed to be used individually as Nintendo Wii-esque hand-held modules. Designed for separate purposes, the Velox, Brutus, and Terra make rather useful controllers for various scenarios. However, things get interesting when they pair up, allowing you to make more complex instruments of gaming, from bike-handlebars, to an F1 steering wheel, to a joypad, and to even a massive plasma shotgun. My personal favorite however is the assembly for archery, that uses 3 Velox modules and one Brutus module.

All modules smartly fit into one another, recognizing what they’re being crafted into when you plug them together. Not only do they come with controls on them, they even include feedback lights, that totally uplift your gaming experience. Let’s hope Nintendo makes this dream come true!

Designer: Sushant Vohra

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[Source”indianexpress”]

Celebrating the Music of Video Games as an Art Form

Celebrating the Music of Video Games as an Art Form

The electronic bleeps and squawks of Tetris, Donkey Kong and other generation-shaping games that you may never have thought of as musical are increasingly likely to be playing at a philharmonic concert hall near you.

From the “ping … ping” of Atari’s 1972 ground-breaking paddle game Pong, the sounds, infectious ditties and, with time, fully-formed orchestral scores that are an essential part of the sensory thrill for gamers have formed a musical universe. With its own culture, sub-cultures and fans, game music now thrives alone, free from the consoles from which it came.

When audiences pack the Philharmonie de Paris’ concert halls this weekend to soak in the sounds of a chamber orchestra and the London Symphony Orchestra performing game music and an homage to one of the industry’s stars, Final Fantasy Japanese composer Nobuo Uematsu, they will have no buttons to play with, no characters to control.

They’re coming for the music and the nostalgia it triggers: of fun-filled hours spent on sofas with a Game Boy, Sonic the Hedgehog and the evergreen Mario.

“When you’re playing a game you are living that music every day and it just gets into your DNA,” says Eimear Noone, the conductor of Friday’s opening two-hour show of 17 titles, including Zelda, Tomb Raider, Medal of Honor and other favorites from the 1980s onward.

“When people hear those themes they are right back there. And people get really emotional about it. I mean REALLY emotional. It’s incredible.”

Dating the birth of game music depends on how one defines music. Game music scholars – yes, they exist – point to key milestones on the path to the surround-sound extravaganzas of games today.

The heartbeat-like bass thump of Taito’s Space Invaders in 1978, which got ever faster as the aliens descended,caused sweaty palms and was habit-forming.

Namco’s Pac-Man, two years later, whetted appetites with an opening musical chirp . For fun, check out the 2013 remix by Dweezil Zappa, son of Frank, and game music composer Tommy Tallarico. Their take on the tune speaks to the sub-culture of remixing game music, with thousands of redos uploaded by fans to sites like ocremix.org – dedicated, it says, “to the appreciation and promotion of video game music as an art form.”

Based on the Russian folk song Korobeiniki, the music of the 1984 game Tetris has similarly undergone umpteen remixes – including Tetris Meets Metal, with more than 2.2 million views on YouTube.

By 1985, the can’t-not-tap-along-to-this theme of Super Mario Bros., the classic adventure of plumber Mario and his brother Luigi, was bringing fame for composer Koji Kondo, also known for his work on Legend of Zelda. Both are on the bill for the Retrogaming concert in Paris. Kondo was the first person Nintendo hired specifically to compose music for its games, according to the 2013 book, Music and Game.

Noone, known herself for musical work on World of Warcraft, Overwatch and other games, says the technological limitations of early consoles – tiny memories, rudimentary chips, crude sounds – forced composers “to distill their melodies down to the absolute kernels of what melodic content can be, because they had to program it note by note.”

But simple often also means memorable. Think “da-da-da-duh” – the opening of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.

“That is part of the reason why this music has a place in people’s hearts and has survived,” Noone says of game tunes. “It speaks to people.”

She says game music is where movie music was 15 years ago: well on its way to being completely accepted.

“I predict that in 15 years’ time it will be a main staple of the orchestral season,” she says. “This is crazy to think of: Today, more young people are listening to orchestral music through the medium of their video game consoles than have ever listened to orchestral music.”

She still sometimes encounters snobbism from orchestras: “They saw ‘Pong’ once and that’s video game music to them, you know?”

But “halfway through the first rehearsal, their attitude has changed,” she adds. “And then when they walk out on stage and the audience treats them like they’re The Rolling Stones.”

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the first game-music concert: The Tokyo Strings Ensemble performed Dragon Quest at Tokyo’s Suntory Hall in August 1987. Now there are six touring shows of symphonic game music, Noone says.

“This is just the best way, the most fun way to introduce kids to the instruments of the orchestra,” she adds. “It may be the first time ever they are that close to a cellist, and that’s really exciting for me.”

 

 

[“source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Sony should do more to boost cross-platform gaming

Sony should do more to boost cross-platform gaming

Halfway through 2017, gamers have a new console from Nintendo to enjoy, a high-end option from Microsoft to look forward to, and increasing interest in VR titles. With these advances in hardware, it seems silly that Sony is pedaling backwards with its decision to keep PS4 gamers away from enjoying cross-platform titles.

Speaking to Eurogamer earlier this month, Jim Ryan, head of global sales and marketing for PlayStation, explained the company’s position:

We have a contract with the people who go online with us, that we look after them and they are within the PlayStation curated universe.

Exposing what in many cases are children to external influences we have no ability to manage or look after, it’s something we have to think about very carefully.

Xbox chief Phil Spencer isn’t buying the argument. In an interview with Giant Bomb, he pointed out that Microsoft owns one of the most family-friendly games around, and noted:

The fact that somebody would kind of make an assertion that somehow we’re not keeping Minecraft players safe, I found — not only from a Microsoft perspective, but from a game industry perspective — like, I don’t know why that has to become the dialogue. Like, that doesn’t seem healthy for anyone.

It’s odd to see Sony avoiding participating in an important phenomenon in the future of multiplayer gaming. Heck, even Nintendo’s getting in on the action: earlier this month, American studio Psyonix announced that it’s bringing its beloved soccer-but-with-cars game, Rocket League, to the Switch this holiday season, with cross-platform support in tow.

The title works between PC and Xbox One, and between PC and PS4 – it’s just that the consoles currently can’t talk to each other, because Sony won’t allow it. According to Psyonix, if Sony gave the go-ahead, it could have Rocket Leaguerunning across platforms in “less than an hour.”

Psyonix’s Jeremy Dunham told Engadget that while Microsoft and Nintendo were quick to work with Psyonix to support cross-platform play, Sony has been stalling the conversation.

Of course, it almost certainly has to do with money: Sony is hammering Microsoft in sales, with a global install base of 60 million PS4s as of June vs. 26 million Xbox Ones that were last reported in January. As the market leader, it may not want to risk losing out on any customers buying a PS4 so they can remain in the PlayStation universe.

But it’s hard to be sure that that’s just how things will go. Last October, the Xbox One outsold the PS4 for the third month in a row in the US. Sony probably knows something we don’t about the future of console sales. The trouble is, that doesn’t help players.

As Dunham explained, granting gamers access to each other across networks would translate into faster matchmaking, better matches and access to better opponents, and therefore, more time spent on consoles and more chances to sell them things like DLC and cosmetic items.

Instead of fighting to stay exclusive, Sony would do well to explore ways in which it can capitalize on the opportunities that cross-platform gaming will present – increased longevity for multiplayer titles, bigger audiences for niche games, and more word-of-mouth promotion of games between owners of various consoles.

[Source”GSmerena”]

Hands-on: Middle Earth: Shadow of War gets more creative with Tolkien’s universe

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A lot of time and effort will be spent discussing Middle Earth: Shadow of War’s improved Nemesis System between now and probably about a month after release. And for good reason—the Nemesis System was the only thing that elevated predecessor Shadow of Mordor from another me-too Assassin’s Creed clone into a technical wunderkind.

Leaning into that aspect for the sequel is probably a good call, especially since we’ve failed to see similar tech make its way through the industry. The dynamic characters that made Shadow of Mordor such a joy are still, three years on, a novelty.

But I had 20 to 30 minutes of hands-on time with Shadow of War during E3 and to be honest, the Nemesis System was the least of my concerns. There was a bit of been-here-done-that to the proceedings, sure—but more problematic is the time investment required to see the Nemesis System in action. The entire concept only flourishes when it’s your cast of characters, when it’s your army of orcs following you into battle against another army of orcs you’ve come to systematically despise.

That’s the whole premise, right?

Middle Earth: Shadow of War

Middle Earth: Shadow of War

So I captured the fortress Monolith had prepared for the demo. I scaled walls, rode the backs of various beasts, hurled poison at foes, leapt hundreds of feet through the air to assassinate an unwary foe. I captured the courtyard, then the outer keep. Lost a few commanders along the way. Killed more than a few of the enemy’s commanders. I made it to the center of the fortress, fought a monstrous troll-enemy while poison spurted from the floor.

It was very similar to the Shadow of War demo we saw back at GDC. The impression I get is still just “Nemesis System, but expanded.” And that’s fine, and I’m sure it’ll be an interesting bit of tech to watch in action when the game releases in October.

Let’s talk about the story, though. Or, rather, the risks Monolith gets to take with the story this time around. That’s what got me really interested last week.

The original Shadow of Mordor’s story wasn’t anything to write home about—it seemed like a barebones scaffolding for an extensive Nemesis System tech demo, as if Monolith came up with this amazing idea and then slapped a license on it. Shadow of Mordor could’ve been an Arkham game, a Suicide Squad game, a Justice League game, another interminable Lego adventure, or any other WB license.

But it wasn’t. It was Lord of the Rings, sort of.

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And so Gollum popped up at one point, there were various bits of fan service hidden in scraps of lore around the world, and what have you. It was ever-so-carefully crafted. Almost too carefully, as is the case with many “Extended Universe”-type stories. Like Tron: Legacy or Star Trek: Into Darkness, an insistence on too-obvious callbacks mixed with hesitance to deface what came before left Shadow of Mordor feeling like a very extensive fan-fiction.

This awkward reverence was everywhere, from our hero Talion acting as poor man’s Aragorn to Marwen’s life force being sucked away by Saruman the same as Theodin’s. Predictable, at best. Boring, most of the time.

Shadow of Mordor spent so long lulling the player into a sense of complacency that when its story finally did go to some weird places—right at the end—it came as a sharp left turn. For 20-odd hours you’d been fed a generic tale of revenge, and then suddenly Monolith decided to upend Tolkien’s whole universe and create a (paradoxical) second One Ring.

Then the game ends.

Middle Earth: Shadow of War

Middle Earth: Shadow of War

The sequel sees Monolith picking up and fleshing out that story, as Talion and his ghost-elf buddy Celebrimbor struggle to take over Mordor as the “Bright Lord.” This plays into the whole Nemesis System of course, with Talion dominating orcs and forcing them to swear fealty to the Bright Lord, conquering entire regions in the name of the Bright Lord, and the like.

But it’s also indicative of a freer hand for Monolith’s writers, an impression that was reinforced when I played one of Shadow of War’s story missions. We followed some orcs into a swamp reminiscent of the book’s Dead Marshes, an eerie fog-filled nightmare full of brackish water. Normal enough for Mordor, and a typical set-up for Shadow of Mordor—take something familiar, then reskin it.

Some orcs imprisoned in elaborate vine growths came as a surprise though, as did the relative calm of the nearby wildlife—creatures that usually attacked Talion on sight simply watched us walk deeper into the swamp.

That’s when the forest spirit approached. Dryad, nymph, or some other Lord of the Rings-centric term I don’t know, what came out of the woods was a 20-foot tall woman made from vines. She then transformed into a warg made from cast-off bark, then into a wooden troll, and finally into a massive wooden dragon, each of which we had to defeat in battle.

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Daniel Masaoka

It’s far more audacious than pretty much anything I saw in Shadow of Mordor. This isn’t just some retread of the films. This is an entirely new creation, a whole new force at play in Middle Earth. Sure, you could draw some loose parallels to the Ents, but the correlation isn’t nearly as 1-to-1 as the various creatures and beings in Shadow of Mordor were.

And for good reason. A Monolith developer was observing as I went through the demo, and I asked about this forest entity, why she seemed so much more creative than what we saw in Shadow of Mordor. His answer was pretty simple—with the success of the first game, the writers were given considerably more freedom this time around. Expect a more daring story, or at least more daring moments as Monolith experiments more within the Lord of the Rings lore.

That’s an interesting prospect, at least to me. If it’s bad? Well, just write it off like the first game, or like any other fan-fiction.

I’d much rather Monolith try something new though. I want a reason to play Shadow of War that isn’t just “Well, the underlying technology is cool.” Especially with the game reportedly many times the size of Shadow of Mordor, the story hook needs to actually hook this time.

We haven’t seen much yet, and I doubt we’ll see much more before the game releases in October, but I came away from the E3 demo feeling more charitable than I did at GDC. Sure, the core of the game is still just “The Nemesis System, but bigger,” but maybe this time the surrounding framework won’t feel quite so skeletal.

That’s the hope, anyway.

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Why Atari’s New Console Could Be Just What The Gaming Industry Needs

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Yesterday, I reported on the recent GamesBeat interview with Atari CEO Fred Chesnais, a chat that confirmed the existence of an upcoming Atari console. The news came as a bit of a surprise, and since that break, speculation has been running wild. Forbes’ own Paul Tassi posted an interesting take on the whole situation, and honestly, I think he makes a great point—the market is indeed full, and introducing a brand new platform, especially one potentially poised to take on those of industry giants like Sony and Microsoft, may be an exercise in overzealous futility. And yet I can’t sit still, so break out the one-button joysticks and dusty Combat cartridges—we’re going to play devil’s advocate.

Even with everything seemingly stacked against such a machine (and there’s a lot, believe me), I still can’t manage to shake my naive excitement. I’ve been gaming for a long time, since the late 80s if I’m counting right, so the prospect of a legitimate Atari revival has set my imagination on fire. I know they’re not even close to the same company that released the 2600 and the Jaguar (or the criminally underappreciated Lynx handheld), but I feel like the potential for something compelling lay not only within this recent hardware announcement, but also amongst the remnant echos of Atari’s yesteryear 8-bit greatness. Before the infamous video game market crash of 1983, they all but owned the digital entertainment market, so who’s to say that they can’t stage a screaming comeback?

The deck is, without a doubt, stacked against such an impromptu market breach. Why? Because as it stands, Sony and Microsoft are in a constant and incredibly expensive battle for console market dominance. And while Nintendo occupies some strange, PG-rated corner of said market, one filled with jovial plumbers, wacky hardware innovation and awful online implementation, they absolutely dominate that space with consistently good first-party titles and an insane degree of consumer loyalty. When paring out the market shares, precious space for an additional dedicated gaming hardware option shrinks to almost nothing. And for the most part, it’s been this way since Sega bowed out of the race back in 2001 with its legendary Dreamcast. So beyond mobile devices and PC, we have three major options for gaming platforms. But what if people want more? What if they’re eager to try something different but lack the opportunity to jump ship?

Believe it or not, there was a time in gaming history when we did have more options. Way more, in fact. Back in the 1990s, all over the span of roughly ten years, the gaming market saw the introduction of a crazy amount of original, completely unique home consoles. Some were weird. Others ludicrously bizarre. Many were quirky experiments that only lasted several months before disappearing forever. Huge mainstream successes like the SNES and N64 were simply the machines that bubbled to the top. For every PlayStation sold there was an Apple Pippin left to forlornly rot on a lonely Circuit City shelf, ignored and forgotten by the gaming masses.

There was Panasonic’s 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, which introduced Gex—and an insane MSRP—to the world. Sega released the Sega CD and 32X, the bulky combination of which made for quite the conversation piece (and a heavy means by which you could defend your house from lions and swooping pterodactyls). And oh God, the Virtual Boy, which didn’t even last a full year before Nintendo pulled the plug. Still, that’s just the tip of the hardware iceberg: CD-i, Amiga CD32, Saturn, and Neo Geo CD are all among the onslaught of consoles that ran the gamut from world-changing to painfully obscure. The failure rate was high, though through all the pricey risks, gamers had choices. Sure, many of them weren’t the best and absolutely didn’t pan out in the long-term, but we weren’t strictly relegated to two or three major sources for our gaming needs. There was a power in that pool of options, and if we wanted to game on a Pioneer LaserActive, we could (though we might cry about it during, after and later).

If Atari’s new product ends up being a proper console with properly powerful innards, it could bring back that sense of choice, something that’s sorely missing from today’s market. Just imagine if they were able to entice several AAA developers and secure a handful of compelling exclusives; Ataribox-only titles you couldn’t find on Xbox, PlayStation or Switch. At the very least, it would make for an interesting 2018 E3, or at least one more exciting than this year’s ho-hum showing.

Oftentimes I’m struck by how homogeneous the gaming industry has become, so I think a gutsy newcomer (in the form of a wise old-timer) would do well to stir up the pot. We need something less, shall we say, predictable. And if the product is solid enough, if it bucks enough trends and pushes the right boundaries, customers may shock analysts and wander outside the comfortable camps that Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo have set up.

It’s all just speculation at this stage, of course, but it’s fun to wonder. I just hope it’s nothing like the Ouya, bless its tiny Android heart.

[Source”GSmerena”]

Update to Final Fantasy 15’s Controversial Chapter 13 Hits March 28

Update to Final Fantasy 15’s Controversial Chapter 13 Hits March 28

Square Enix confirms that the previously announced tweaks to a particularly divisive chapter of Final Fantasy 15 will be distributed via an update on March 28.

Several weeks after its release, it seems that the consensus is that Final Fantasy 15 is a good game — and its sales performance certainly backs up its critical reception. However, there’s one section that many critics and fans didn’t enjoy too much; Chapter 13.

If you’re still working your way through Final Fantasy 15, be warned, as it’s difficult to discuss why Square Enix is making changes to the sequence without straying into spoiler territory. Chapter 13 is something of a departure from the bulk of the game, and many would argue that it detracts from the overall experience.

This particular section of Final Fantasy 15 sees protagonist Noctis separated from his party, trapped in a maze, and stripped of many of his most useful abilities. Rather than the role-playing road trip they were previously enjoying, players are forced to stealthily evade robots in a labyrinth of darkened corridors.

The game’s director, Hajime Tabata, has stated that Chapter 13 was intended to offer a jarring contrast to the rest of the game. However, he’s also admitted that his ideas weren’t executed perfectly, confirming that plans were in motion to tweak this particular section in a future update.

“The amount of stress inflicted on the player while running through this chapter was greater than we had anticipated,” Tabata explained while speaking to US Gamer earlier this month. “We believe resolving this issue will naturally lead to a better gameplay experience.”

Now, we now exactly when the update to Chapter 13 is scheduled to be released. During an Active Time Report livestream that took place yesterday, Square Enix confirmed that the update will drop on March 28, according to a report from Gematsu.

The company also revealed a major component of the changes being made to Chapter 13. Apparently, there will be a short section where Gladiolus Amicitia serves as the playable character — although it’s not completely clear whether this is actually part of Chapter 13, as the update is set to bring “enhancements” to various sections of the final stages of Final Fantasy 15.

It’s good to see Tabata and Square Enix responding to one of the sections of Final Fantasy 15 that has garnered the most criticism. Here’s hoping that next month’s update can remove some of its frustrating aspects while still retaining its larger role in the game’s narrative.

 

 
[Source:- GR]

 

Ghost Recon: Wildlands Closed Beta Gameplay Details

Ghost Recon: Wildlands Closed Beta Gameplay Details

With the next closed beta kicking off tomorrow, Ubisoft reveals what sort of content and map size players will be able to play through in Ghost Recon: Wildlands this weekend.

Ubisoft is firing on all cylinders lately as the company just wrapped up another successful closed beta session for its upcoming melee game, For Honor, along with getting ready to send out the final known expansion for The Division known as Last Stand. Rainbow Six Siege is also getting ready to launch its first season 2 content with Operation Velvet Shell, which introduces two new Spanish operators and a new map. Next on the to do list is Ghost Recon: Wildlands, as another closed beta test which is scheduled to kick off tomorrow and run through the weekend.

Thanks to a recent guide from Ubisoft, fans now have a good idea on what kind of content will be waiting for them starting tomorrow. Even though the map in Ghost Recon: Wildlands is quite massive with 21 regions, only the Itacua province will be available, though even this region appears to be pretty sizable. Every main story mission as well as all side activities will be unlocked in this region, and players have the option to play through them solo alongside three AI bots or with up to three human co-op players.

In addition to checking out the gameplay and missions, players also have full access to both the player character customization tools and the Gunsmith. Though briefly detailed last year in a trailer, Gunsmith is essentially the tool that enables players to look at and customize their currently unlocked set of weapons in the game. With over 50 customizable guns in the game, players can use Gunsmith to add or remove attachments, switch weapons, and further customize them with sprays and other items as they see fit.

Most fans will also be happy to note that even though this is a closed beta, Ubisoft is not including an NDA and is encouraging players to share and stream the beta content. Considering that most fans enjoy getting in-game loot in exchange for participating in beta events, Ubisoft has also promised a free Llama shirt for all beta players to customize their character with once the full game launches in March.

Players already accepted into the beta can start preloading the tactical shooter now in preparation before tomorrow. While not everyone will be able to experience the beta, reports from players have begun to trickle in over not being able to use their unlock code or not receiving invites at all. With a bit more time left before the servers go live, hopefully these issues can be sorted out before the beta officially starts tomorrow.

Are you looking forward to this open world title or are you in wait and see mode before committing? Let us know in the comments below.

Ghost Recon: Wildlands closed beta will be available from February 3 to February 6 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. The game then releases in full on March 7, 2017.

 

 

[Source:- GR]

 

Nintendo President Defends ‘Weak’ Switch Launch Line-Up

Nintendo President Defends ‘Weak’ Switch Launch Line-Up

Nintendo president Tatsumi Kimishima defends the Nintendo Switch’s launch line-up, pledging that the system won’t experience the same software droughts that have plagued its predecessors.

When Nintendo unveiled the Switch earlier this month, many were convinced of the company’s vision for a system that blurred the line between home console and portable device. However, the potential of the hardware itself was tempered by a launch line-up that doesn’t give early adopters much to be excited about.

It’s clear that Nintendo is banking on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild to give fans a reason to buy the console on day one. The company’s only other first-party release scheduled for launch day is 1-2-Switch, and the rest of its intial library is fleshed out by third-party titles like Super Bomberman R, Skylanders: Imaginators, and The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth+.

As such, it’s easy to see why Nintendo has received some criticism for an underwhelming array of games to convince gamers to get on board with the Switch as soon as possible. Now, the company’s president Tatsumi Kimishima has spoken out against these comments.

“Some of those who have seen this line-up have expressed the opinion that the launch line-up is weak,” said Kimishima during an earnings call earlier this week, according to a report from Gamespot. It seems that the company’s strategy hinges around a steady stream of content coming after launch day.

“Our thinking in arranging the 2017 software lineup is that it is important to continue to provide new titles regularly without long gaps,” he explained. “This encourages consumers to continue actively playing the system, maintains buzz, and spurs continued sales momentum for Nintendo Switch.”

Software droughts have certainly been a problem for Nintendo in the past. Both the Wii U and the 3DS experienced stretches without compelling releases in their early years — although it’s fair to say that the 3DS managed to overcome these hurdles much more convincingly than the Wii U did.

It’s good to see Nintendo’s management thinking about its long-term plans for the Switch, rather than focusing all their efforts on a successful launch. Hopefully this strategy comes to fruition, and we see high-profile titles like Super Mario Odyssey meet their expected release date and debut within the first year of the console’s lifespan.

Nintendo is certainly doing a good job of promoting its new console, and the concept behind the Switch could help the hardware carve out its own niche. However, a strong software library is essential if the system is to avoid the pitfalls that sank the Wii U.

 

 

[Source:- GR]

 

Call of Duty: Black Ops 2: Phil Spencer Wants Shooter for Xbox One Backward Compatibility

Call of Duty: Black Ops 2: Phil Spencer Wants Shooter for Xbox One Backward Compatibility

Phil Spencer, the head of Microsoft’s Xbox division, expresses his desire for Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 to join the list of Xbox One’s backward compatible games.

According to information found on the Xbox Feedback site, Activision and Treyarch’s 2012 shooter Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 is currently the most highly requested game by fans for the Xbox One’s backward compatibility program, with more than 207,000 community votes, which is far more than gamers’ second choice of The Elder Scrolls 5: Skyrim, which presently holds upwards of 170,000 votes. Although Skyrim is an incredibly coveted candidate to become backward compatible on Xbox One, not only do the fans want Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 to show up on the program’s list more, but also the head of Microsoft’s Xbox division, Phil Spencer, has expressed his interest in the shooter making its way onto the company’s current generation platform.

In response to a fan on Twitter, Spencer revealed his desire for Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 coming to backward compatibility by initially apologizing for his lack of response by not addressing the community’s sheer craving for the title to show up on the program’s catalog of games. The Xbox boss followed up his apology by saying, “I really want to see this come to BC.”

 

[Source:- GR]

 

Pokemon GO Datamine Suggests More Gen 2 Additions

Pokemon GO Datamine Suggests More Gen 2 Additions

The dataminers at Silph Road are back at it again, this time unveiling code that suggests that Pokemon GO will be getting more Gen 2 monsters in the near future.

Pokemon GO might not have made many people’s list for the best games of 2016, but it was ubiquitous in gaming discussions for what seemed like the entire year. Niantic’s mobile killer app proved that a little brand recognition can go a long way in the mobile gaming industry, and Pokemon GO quickly became the fastest selling and most profitable game on iOS and Android devices.

The shine on the game may have dulled in recent months after Pokemon GO‘s developers failed to address a number of core issues fans had with the mechanics behind the title, but it has nevertheless held onto its status as the mobile app to beat in 2017. One of the biggest weapons Pokemon GO has available to it in order to maintain its relevance is the anticipation that the features fans have been clamoring for will inevitably be added, as evidence by Pokemon GO‘s latest update file. Pokemon GOdataminers have been uncovering potential updates with each patch release, and this one is no different – according to the dataminers from Silph Road, Pokemon GO will be getting more Gen 2 Pokemon in the near future.

Pokemon GO‘s latest update contains new data for evolutionary items, and although they haven’t been implemented yet, their presence within the code indicates that they likely will be soon. The five evolutionary items present in the code are the King’s Rock, Metal Coat, Upgrade, Sun Stone, and Dragon Scale items, each of which made their first appearance in Pokemon games in Pokemon Silverand Pokemon Gold.

Those items would make a lot of sense for inclusion in Pokemon GO, as Niantic has demonstrated that, while the developer is willing to slowly introduce new Pokemon to the game, it would much prefer those Pokemon to be related to ones that are already in-game already. The evolutionary items present in the code indicate that gamers should be seeing Bellossom, Porygon2, Kingdra, Steelix, and the mighty Slowking in the coming months, and all of them are related to first-gen counterparts.

 

 

[Source:- GR]