Become a certified web design pro and save over $1500 on the training

Web Design CPD Certification Bundle

With more than 140,000 websites going live every day, now is the perfect time to become a web designer. Whether you want to turn pro or just improve your own sites, the Web Design CPD Certification Bundle teaches you everything you need to know. You can get all four courses and 32.5 hours of training for $39 via the Popular Science Shop.

When you’re building a website, you need both code and design skills. It also helps to understand search engine optimization and how to create your own animations. This bundle covers all of these skills through hands-on video lessons. You also work toward a Master Diploma, accredited by the highly-respected CPD Certification Service.

The first course tackles HTML5 and CSS3, the building blocks of every website. You learn how to create custom layouts and add your own style. The course on Photoshop helps you edit images with a guided tour through all the major tools. You also learn how to craft responsive sites using Adobe Dreamweaver, before adding interactive content with Flash.

[source:-popsci.]

‘WHY AREN’T THERE MORE FEMALE DEVELOPERS?’

Andy Golpys says the gender gap in tech impacts every business so they must help take steps to close it

The co-founder and creative director of North West web design studio MadeByShape has called on other businesses to help encourage more women into tech careers.

Last year it was reported 50,000 girls were turning away from a STEM education each year. An extensive PwC survey showed that only three per cent of females expressed that a career in tech would be their first choice, with only five per cent of females holding leadership positions in the sector.

“I wanted to use my experience, alongside insights from some North West digital heavyweights, to ask the question ‘Why aren’t there more female web developers?’,” says Andy Golpys.

READ MORE: 101 FEMALE ROLE MODELS IN TECH

Golpys has worked as a university lecturer for eight years, focusing on web design and development alongside running successful web design studio, MadeByShape.

He says he found that for graphic design students choosing between disciplines such as illustration, photography, web design or motion, only around 50 per cent of students choose web and of this small number very few are female.

“Do we need to look at why enough female students aren’t picking web as an option?,” he says.

“If so, does work need to be done to reinforce how big the industry is (and is likely to grow), how many opportunities there are for jobs, or how eye catching the pay salaries and company benefits are?

“The number of females choosing Graphic Design and similar courses is high, so what is the reason for them not to choosing web, with digital now emerging as a bigger industry than print design?

“Are they just not interested in coding all day every day? Would they rather be on the creative or client side of an agency? Or is it simply that a career in tech has not been previously mentioned to them and so it has never been considered?”

Women in Tech

Golpys adds that he has noticed movement in the area in the last couple of years with actions being taken to address the issues and figureheads in the sector engaging in activity to help make a change.

“At MadeByShape we have provided numerous opportunities to students and graduates, both male and female, to come and work with us on live briefs, with team members on hand to answer questions,” he says.

The company is also now working with local colleges to target a younger audience by offering work experience to those interested in the digital sector.

“During a three week placement, that individual will gain a great insight and have a good idea whether this is something that they enjoy; this is a valuable opinion to take away.”

He summarises: “We all know that there is a massive digital skills gap in this country; add to that the fact that women are hugely under-represented in the sector and you’re left with something of a problem.

“No matter who you are or where you work, the gender gap in tech already impacts you so what is important now are the steps we take to start closing this together.”

[Source”indianexpress”]

Master Essential Web Design Tools While Earning Professional Accreditation

Whether you’re a seasoned web designer or interested in learning the ropes, the The Web Design CPD Certification Bundle will deepen your knowledge of all the essential Adobe tools.

From Photoshop to Dreamweaver, Flash to HTML and CSS, you’ll learn how to develop beautiful web pages, edit graphics, build responsive websites, animate and more. It’s all the skills any rockstar designer would need in their toolkit — plus, you can earn valuable professional development credits as you move through the courses.

Get four immersive lessons you can reference at any time: Pick up  The Web Design CPD Certification Bundle for $39 today

[Source”timesofindia”]

Why evolution is better than revolution in product design

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Digital products will always need to be redesigned. Styles progress, hardware technologies advance, and development possibilities are ever-increasing. Just in the past year the potential for implementing microinteractions, and processor-intensive animations and graphics, has come along at a fair pace. Product teams are continuously looking to iterate and stay ahead of or pass the competition. This is ever important in furthering the design and development industries, and delivering to the consumer the very best product available.

The process of redesigning is not always so straightforward. There are times when teams and individuals have to decide whether to redesign from the ground up, or iterate on the current product. In this article we are going to look at both options and analyze just why redesigning from scratch should be avoided in the majority of cases.

REDESIGNING FROM SCRATCH

To begin, redesigning from scratch should not always be avoided. On occasion, a company can inherit a product simply for the user base, domain name, or because they see the potential to completely re-engineer the product from the ground up, into something completely different.

One example of a product that completely redesigned from the ground up is Bebo. What was once a fast-growing social network has since become multiple new products as a result of complete redesigns. In its latest relaunch, it has been developed into a messaging app, somewhat reminiscent of Slack.

The issue with redesigning from scratch, is you pose the risk of alienating users. In certain cases, the product can have such underperforming design and UX, that it leaves this as the only appropriate course of action. The issue is when products are redesigned for little reason other than for change for its own sake.

It’s important to ask two questions when pondering this decision:

  • Does my vision for the product clash considerably with the current design and framework?
  • Is the current product posing multiple substantial design and UX issues for users?

If the answer to either is yes, then this may well be the most appropriate course.

If you believe a redesign may cause a loss of users, answering yes to either should override any worries you have of this being the case. Sometimes, and only sometimes, a small proportion of the existing user base who are entirely opposed to change has to be discounted in order to move the product forward. You just have to be sure you are truly moving the product forward with a complete redesign—there has to be clear underlying reasons such as above.

REDESIGNING IN ITERATIONS

For most cases, this should be the route to take. By continuously iterating on a product, you avoid alienating the current user base by by slowly but surely introducing new UI and UX enhancements with each version. This is a lot easier to digest for users, and typically helps avoid having them move to competitors. It also allows for the removal of a feature if proven not to be effective or useful for new and existing users.

Redesigning in iterations can also often result in the best possible product. When you are constantly redesigning from the ground up, it eliminates the positive effects of stepwise refinement.

Take Google’s core search product, for example. I’d argue they have never redesigned completely, and instead continuously iterated over multiple decades. With Google, they have an incredibly complex product, but a simple interface, and have iterated upon this in small steps to the point now where the product is extremely refined, powerful, and easy to use.

Another such example is InVision. A few years ago, they could have completely wiped the design which was looking tired and outdated. Instead of building something new with the latest short-term style trends, they chose to iterate on the current version one step at a time with the outlook of creating one of the finest design industry tools. All the while, they kept existing users satisfied by not overhauling every feature and layout.

In the above examples, you can see just how the product has progressed from something very dated, to a cutting-edge, industry leading product design—all through continuous iterating on the features, layout, and styles.

This approach also excludes the issue of overhauling a design every time the design team or lead is changed. It provides a consistent approach over long periods of time, and avoids individual designs and styles making their mark at the users’ expense.

Next time you are working on a design, ask yourself: should I really redesign this product from scratch, or can we achieve better long-term results with stepwise refinement?

 

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

Meet the man behind Comic Sans

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We’ve all seen Comic Sans; the typeface that’s both loathed and (secretly) admired—some people have even dedicated a website to educating people about the very limited use cases of comic sans! It’s made a huge global impact in the decades since its original use-case, Microsoft’s Bob program.

By 1996, it was popular enough to be preinstalled on every Macintosh computer that rolled off the assembly line, but how exactly did this font come to be? What mind was behind this ultra-kiddy font?

Check out this video and meet Vincent Connare, for all intents and purposes, the father of Comic Sans. When he came up with the idea for the font, he looked through stacks and stacks of comic books, which is probably unsurprising. In particular, he leafed through DC Comics’ Batman and Watchmen stories…and he was inspired!

Commissioned by Microsoft to create a font, Connare came up with a font that resembled the comic lettering he’d noticed in the stories’ speech and thought bubbles.

Unfortunately for Connare, his boss at the time, one Robert Norton, disliked his comic-inspired typeface. Norton thought the face ought to be more “typographic” and had something against its overall quirkiness and weirdness. Connare persisted and defended Comic Sans’ ability to stand out, as it looked markedly different than anything people would look at in their school textbooks. Even so, Comic Sans didn’t make it into Bob’s final release, but ultimately, Connare had the last laugh.

Today, comic sans is freely viewable all over the world! While the font is definitely overexposed, Connare does nonetheless get a huge amount of gratification from all the places he’s seen the font when he travels. Whether it’s in neon signs for small businesses or on war memorials and packages of bread, Connare is vindicated.

he has no regrets surrounding the font

To hear Connare put it, he has no regrets surrounding the font. On the contrary, while he freely admits that comic sans definitely isn’t one of the better forms of art, it is still, conceptually, the very best thing that he’s ever accomplished in his career, in all likelihood.

All told, not a bad outcome for a guy who worked as a typographic engineer at Microsoft and, arguably, whose most famous font never saw the light of day in the original Microsoft program for which it was intended. Interestingly, Connare was also a contributor for other famous faces such as Trebuchet.

To understand why he came up with comic sans in the first place, we have to understand his philosophy on art. Good art was art that was noticed while bad art was art that no one noticed and, therefore, was a failure.

 

 

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

5 psychology rules every UX designer must know

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Experience-based design…if that’s how you define your work as a designer, it might be a good time to reevaluate your approach.

Now, there’s nothing wrong with being an experienced designer; your experience could be an asset! However, it is essential to realize that there are many moving parts in a working design. For example, do you know that you shouldn’t just drastically redesign a website? Or that the color that works on the exact same website (featuring the same thing and in the same niche) will differ if the audience was predominantly male compared to if the audience was predominantly female?

There’s a psychological approach to web design—based on decades of studies and psychology experiments. Below are five psychology-backed UX tips for your next redesign:

1) WEBER’S LAW OF JUST NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCE

Anyone who’s used Facebook over the last 5 years knows that not much has changed in that time. Facebook is a mega corporation worth over $350 billion, so you might expect a lot to have changed in three years. Why is Facebook retaining every key element of its design? The answer to this same question explains why every major website—including Google, Twitter and Amazon, despite their large budgets—do not make drastic redesigns.

It is explained by Weber’s law of just noticeable difference, which states that the slightest change in things won’t result in a noticeable difference; if you’re looking at a bulb, for example, and the light dims or brightens just a bit, you’re unlikely to notice the change—if it brightens significantly, however, you will notice the change. In the same way, if you’re carrying a weight of 100kg, removing 1kg from it is unlikely to make much of a difference in the weight, you’re unlikely to notice it. If you were to remove 10kg from the 100kg weight, however, the difference in weight becomes instantly apparent.

Research shows that we dislike a massive change in existing structures and systems, even if those changes will benefit us, and there is ample evidence that show protests when major websites make massive changes and redesign.

Simply put, Weber’s law coupled with our natural averseness to change shows that the best way to approach a redesign is subtly; make your redesign slow and subtle, changing a little here and there gradually—in such a way that most people won’t even know you’re doing a redesign—until you’ve completely revamped the redesign. Not only will this ensure your design is well accepted by the majority, but a good portion of your audience would have gotten used to your redesign before it is completed and very few will complain.

2) UNDERSTAND THAT WE RESPOND TO COLOR DIFFERENTLY

While we often deeply trust our instinct and experience, it is another thing for them to stand science’s test. For example, do you know that the same design that works for an audience of male readers often won’t work for an audience of female readers—even if it’s for the same website selling the very same products?

One of the most important factors you should consider when redesigning a website is the audience. Are the audience predominantly male or female? This matters a great deal!

Research has found that people will form an opinion about things within 90 seconds, and that color influences up to 90 percent of the opinion people form. The color you use for your design alone can make it a failure or success.

That said, it is important to realize that men and women see colors differently. The graphics below show the colors both men and women like as well as the colors they dislike the most:

3) THE SENSORY ADAPTATION PHENOMENON

Have you ever wondered about why you don’t feel your clothes or shoes? Ever wondered about why, even though you were initially irritated by it, you no longer notice your neighbor’s dog’s constant barking?

This is explained by a psychological phenomenon called “sensory adaptation.” It states that we tend to tune out stimulus if we get repeatedly exposed to it—initially, we find it annoying, but later we just don’t notice it.

Now, how does this relate to web design? It’s simple: you design a website and use the very same color scheme and button color for important parts that you want the user to take action on. Due to the fact that these essential parts blend in with the design color scheme, and that people have been seeing the same color all over your design, people are naturally wired to tune them out—they don’t see the key elements on your page, and you lose out on conversions.

When designing or redesigning a website, it is essential to make your CTAs stand out; if the whole design color scheme is blue, you must not use the color blue for the CTA or to highlight the most important action on the page. Most people believe the color red or orange is the most effective for boosting conversions; it isn’t. A color red button used on a page with red color scheme will convert awfully, but a color green button on the same page will convert much better.

Use something that stands out for essential elements; this way, it doesn’t activate people’s sensory adaptation, and your conversion doesn’t suffer.

4) TYPE: BIGGER IS BETTER!

When it comes to text, designers often obsess over look and appeal: “Wow, should I use a serif?” “That new font looks dope! Let me give it a shot!” Except that psychology shows that, when it comes to design, most of the things we designers give importance to are not what the end users really care about. Why we care about aesthetics and how appealing the latest typeface will make our design appear, the average user cares about basic things like usability.

In essence, the average user cares a lot more about font size than about font type. In fact, research has shown that people want type to be bigger and simpler, and that larger type elicits a strong emotional connection in readers.

In essence, people want simple, large type. Based on data from available research, experts advise not using a font-size lesser than 16px.

5) PERCEPTUAL SET

What you see will differ depending on your experiences; as with the image of the “vase or two faces,” if you’re an artist, especially if you just finished working on a vase, you’re likely to see a vase in the image. If you just left a gathering of lots of people, and if you’ve not seen a vase in months, you’re likely to see two faces.

This phenomenon is explained by the “perceptual set theory,” which explains our tendency to perceive information based on our expectations, existing information and experiences. In essence, people from different cultures are likely to perceive the very same thing differently.

The implication for web designers is that people have certain expectations of web design—some general and some based on certain industries. For example, most people have a certain expectation for where a site’s navigation bar will be (in the header), putting it elsewhere (in the footer, for example) will confuse a lot of users and lead to bad user experience. The same goes for every element of your site design.

It’s good to be innovative. When you’re going to be innovative, however, make sure you include clues to guide people about the new elements. Most importantly, test people’s response to the new elements and readily change anything people do not respond well to.

Trust Science to Help You Build Your Personal Brand

Trust Science to Help You Build Your Personal Brand

Your brain is hardwired to devour visual information. In fact, neurons that process visual information make up 30 percent of the cerebral cortex — compared with 8 percent to decode input from your sense of touch and 3 percent devoted to sorting out auditory cues.

You can’t control the resources your brain allocates to processing what you see. It doesn’t even matter whether you’re particularly interested in the image you’re viewing. Your brain is working to make sense of visual messages. Once it’s completed that work, the frontal lobe takes over. Your higher mental functions kick in, and your brain begins making judgments about what you’ve just seen.

Translate all this neuroscience to the business world, and you’ll realize that your clients and potential customers are judging your personal brand’s appearance, too. Ideally, your identity should accomplish three things: accurately represent your message, convey quality and encourage consumers to take your desired action.

Where to start?

What reaction do you want to trigger in people who come in contact with your personal brand? Should they follow you on social? Hire you for speaking engagements or professional services you provide? Download a white paper? Subscribe to your email list?

While all might be favorable goals, one must emerge as the most important. Decide on that priority outcome, and allow it to guide every choice you make as you develop your brand identity.

 

How can visual cues translate to text?

Next, you’ll choose colors and fonts. These elements should give the correct impression of your brand and reinforce your desired action. You don’t need to go back to the color wheel and start from scratch. Most likely, you already know which colors you like. If you’re not already familiar with the basics of color psychology, do a little research online. You’ll find plenty of reputable marketing resources have invested time and money to understand which hues produce certain emotions in most people.

 

Keep your text uncluttered by sticking with one font for headings and another regular body copy. It’s common to select a sans serif font — without the “little feet” that finish off each letter’s strokes — for headings. League Spartan or Open Sans are a few solid choices. Serif fonts tend to be more readable in longer passages, which is why they are a natural fit for everything else. View samples of Baskerville, Georgia and Times New Roman to get a feel for how they compare.

What impact can colors and fonts really make?

Your color and font choices must do much more than stand up on a static page. You’ll need to try them out in dynamic applications, too. Here’s an example of two “Subscribe” buttons. They appear on identical landing pages, with only the shade of red adjusted to gauge reaction.

 

 

[Source:- Entrepreneur]

 

6 Skills You Can Learn Online for a Lucrative and Productive 2017

6 Skills You Can Learn Online for a Lucrative and Productive 2017

I am so much in love with this era we are in — an era where there is so much information online for self-development. A focused and determined person can learn many skills online and use them to diversify his or her income. With all the advanced, digital technology in this world, no one should give excuses of not having one or two skills to remain relevant and competitive.

In the days of yore, skill acquisition and dissemination were limited to certain geographical locations because of the low level of technological know-how. However, the advent of sophisticated technology — which propelled the development of many apps, software and social media — has made skills and knowledge easily disseminated and accessible.

 

There are countless websites readily available for you to acquire valuable skills and knowledge for free or with little fee for a productive 2017. These skills are:

1. Web design and development.

Web design and development is a highly sought-after skill. This is because we are in a digital transformation age where every business — small, medium and large scale — is extremely interested in showcasing their products and services to the world through their websites.

There are lots of sites that can teach you how to design and develop a website. By acquiring these skills, one is adequately positioned to scramble for millions of small, medium and large scale businesses who are contemplating launching or updating their websites.

2. Statistical data analysis.

Statistical data analysis is another vital skill that is in high demand by companies, entrepreneurs and students. The knowledge of Mini-tab,  Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) and E-view, just to name a few, makes a person highly desirable.

As a researcher, I have smiled all the way to the bank numerous times because I have some knowledge of statistical data analytical software. Most students in tertiary institutions need an expert data analyst — companies too, especially when sophisticated software is needed for forecasting market shares, profit and other vital results that will aid managerial decision making.

You can learn these data analytical tools online, and consult an expert for clarification should you encounter some difficulties trying to grasp the calculations and interpretation of results.

3. Fashion designing.

Humans are always in need of food, clothes and shelter. These are three basic necessities of life. Both rich and poor are in need of clothes. In our contemporary world where fashion is always a trending issue, everybody wants to look classic and beautiful. This has made fashion designers kings and queens in their profession.

There are sites that can teach you how to draw fashion or make fashion sketches, and there are lots of online videos that can teach you make dresses. The beauty of having this skill lies in the way customers flock around fashion designers within few hours of setting up an office.

Fashion designing is synonymous to a football match; there is never a dull moment from the blast of the whistle. What do I mean? Even at the apprentice stage, customers are already flocking around you.

 

4. Make-up.

Believe it or not, the makeup business is growing at an incredible rate. There are lots of online videos that can teach you the rudiment of make up. An interview with Ifeoma Agu, the CEO of Ivonmelda Makeova, shocked me. She is an expert in hairstyle but felt she needed a makeup skill to enhance her business growth.

However, since she couldn’t afford the training fees, she decided to download lots of YouTube videos on makeup. The rest is history. She is one of the most sought-after makeup artists in her state as a result of her quality service delivery. Remember, she learned this skill for free. You can do same.

5. Business research.

Many people want to venture into business while those who are already in business are seeking other businesses to invest in. Many companies and investors are actually seeking well-researched business ideas to invest in.

As a business researcher, you can work on your own terms. You decide whether to sell your business ideas or become a partner in the businesses. At the end of the day, you will be surprised to see that you are a co-owner of chains of businesses.

Acquiring this skill is not as difficult as you think. I am saying this because most people are indifferent when it comes to research. All you need is to be patient, focus and determined. Read online articles and journals or watch videos on business research. It’s also a good idea to consult an expert.

6. Own a blog.

You can actually learn how to create and run a blog online. By systematically following the step-by-step instructions on creating a blog, you’ll be acquiring the skill to create more blogs for prospective clients. You can create a blog for your web design and development business, statistical data analysis, fashion designing, makeup and business research businesses.

 

Successful bloggers today started by simply creating a blog. The rest is history. You too can join the leagues of successful bloggers by meticulously following their footsteps.

There is so much to be gained by acquiring one or more skills online. Big organizations looked for people with the talents and skills discussed above in 2016. And 2017 will not be different. Learn a skill online today for a productive year.

 

 

[Source:- Entrepreneur]

 

How to Start and Run a Successful Web Design Business?

How to Start and Run a Successful Web Design Business?

While listening to the stories of great web designers it seems that starting a web design business is much easy. But the process of starting your own business is not that easy as it seems; you not only need to have designing skills but along with that, a full-fledged plan and sincere efforts are also required to get your business run successfully.

Once designers get experience and acquire skills to handle projects on an individual basis, they think of working as a freelancer or starting their own web designing company. No doubt it is a good idea but it requires a blend of strategic thinking, thoughtful and skilled efforts, and tenacity to convert your dreams into reality. However, all those, who are planning to start their own web designing business, can refer to the below-given tips for a perfect start and seamless running of their web design business.

  • Know your strengths and weaknesses

Your strengths will let you choose main services you would be offering and your weaknesses will help you at avoiding wastage of time and energy on the things that can be handled by someone else.

If you have planned to start your own business then definitely you will be hiring some staff for it. So, a thing that you need to do at first is knowing the tasks you are excellent at and you would handle yourself, and knowing the ones for which you would need someone’s help.

  • Know your market

No doubt you would be delivering the services you are good at but don’t offer people what you are trying to sell. Instead, try to know what they are looking for and tailor your services to their needs. If you are finding it hard then you can get some potential clients to tell you about their requirements for web designs.

Ross Williams of Rawnet Ltd explains: “In the beginning there was a rush for everyone to have a website. Now the focus is on the most innovative and exciting.”

  • Have a clear thought about your offerings

Once you have known your market, enlist all your offerings. It depends on your skill set and talent that what services you would be offering to your clients. More clarity about offerings means greater chances of success. Here are some questions that you should ask to yourself for finalizing your services:

– If you want to deliver services all over the world or just to local clients?

– If you want the payment for the whole job or on an hourly or daily basis?

– If you will be managing the client relationships yourself or would hire a professional?

  • Design an attractive website

As people would be hiring you for web designing services, they will definitely notice the design of your own website to have an idea about the quality. So, design an attractive website to reflect your business to the best. It should be responsive, fast and engaging so that viewers will just enjoy the browsing process on it. Clear and easy navigation along with the relevant content are the two main things that will add value to your business website.

Andy Budd of Clearleft explains. “The quality of design work is so high, that you have to be really, really good to actually get work.”

  • Be active on the Social Media

Social Media is no more restricted to establish social connections among the people, its approach has reached a far behind that. It has become the excellent way to promote your services, drive traffic to your website, attract potential customers and form a network of the people who have the same niche. So, understand the importance of all the social media platforms and the way you can use them to maximize your business profits.

  • Show your credibility

When clients shop around for web designing services, they look for the experts. So, showing your credibility to the world is really essential. Mention all the essential educational details, certifications and work experiences on your profile as it would give people a reason to trust you and your services. Enhance your credibility by posting visual content about your area of expertise and by updating yourself as per the latest industry trends.

In the last, we would like to say that this is an era of tough competition, so you would need to keep patience and show perseverance regardless how many hardships you face to get started. And once you have an effective and thoughtful foundation in place, success will come your way on its own. It is well said by Gurpreet Walia, CEO at Suffescom Solutions- “The way to get started is to stop talking and start working as per your plans”.

 

 

[Source:- Entrepreneur]

 

Designing effective web surveys

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Web surveys are important tools that websites and businesses can use to gauge important feedback from their site visitors and customers. Web surveys are also somewhat unsung elements of a site because their role is primarily to collect data instead of being a main feature.

In e-commerce, and in any business really, determining what your customers want is largely based on directly asking them. Plus, doing so will also give you amazing insight into the user experience—what’s working, what’s not, and what could and should be improved!

So, as you see, using web surveys offers a lot of benefits. Of course, designing them properly has a lot to do with whether or not they’re successful for any site.

We’re going to skip the part about defining your survey’s objective and being clear on the type of feedback you want since that’s a given for any successful survey. Rather, we’ll only focus on the survey-design aspect.

1) THE USE OF IMAGES

You probably have a belief in your head that a web survey should be mostly just a bunch of rote lines all up and down the webpage, with each line asking a question. While that’s definitely the classic or old-school idea of a survey…designing it in such a stark and empty fashion won’t do any wonders for its conversion rate!

Using images throughout your survey—intelligently spaced and breaking up different sections—has been proven to influence the conversion rate, but also other, very important survey behaviors.

Survey Monkey ran an interesting experiment tied in to the 2015 UK elections. They had three treatments of their survey design, each with three, unique images—which was the only constant variation in the design (they phrased the question of who respondents wanted as PM differently in two of three designs). They wanted to determine how the click and completion rates were affected.

The images they used were:

  • The entrance to 10 Downing Street (where the British PM lives).
  • A color-coded map of the UK, colored by party representation.
  • Rosettes (ribbons for military decoration).

The map image performed the best in terms of the click rate, which was 9.3%. The Downing Street entrance did the worst with only 5.9%, and the rosettes has 8.2%.

On the completion rate side, the images didn’t really affect this stat, as both the map and Downing Street images had a completion rate of 89.9% while the rosettes did a bit better with 90.9%.

This makes a lot of sense, as images have been proven to affect the conversion rates of sites. On the web, using images in your design always leads to better results.

So when you’re designing surveys, don’t just include images, but think carefully about the ones you’re using. In surveys, they should relate somehow to respondent characteristics for maximum impact.

2) UNDERSTANDING THE LIMITATIONS OF MOBILE

When it comes to mobile, surveys are a double-edged sword. On one hand, more people are now using mobile than desktop, so more people than ever will be taking your survey on their smartphones. Unfortunately, the survey user experience is just worse on mobile for a number of reasons.

The big problem is time. Surveys on mobile take users anywhere from 11% to 50% longer to complete than those on desktop. Users and customers today value speed more than anything in UX, so the length of time for survey completion on mobile is definitely a big cause of friction.

This slowness boils down to three reasons in particular:

  • Server connections on mobile are just slower than high-speed, desktop Internet.
  • The smaller screen sizes of mobile make it harder to read and get through survey questions.
  • Users are just more distracted on their smartphones, particularly when attempting to do surveys in transit.

What can be done about this slow mobile speed?

For starters, don’t use matrix questions, which are those multiple questions shown on a grid. You’ve seen them anytime you’ve ever had to answer a survey question, but they aggravate the UX by forcing users to scroll up and down and left and right. Doing all of this on a small smartphone screen is clearly a nuisance. Instead, forego multiple choice questions and answers with more direct questions that only require a yes or no answer from users (and, therefore, no need for a grid).

Keep the length of your surveys relatively short to increase completions.

Of course, remember to always test your survey across various devices: iOS, Android and desktop.

ABOVE ALL: DESIGN FOR USER EXPERIENCE

Designers and developers are always taught to first design for the user experience. Designing a web survey can be a tad tricky since you’re not dealing with a conventional page, but it’s a great chance nonetheless to apply all that you know about designing for great UX.

The Laboratory for Automation Psychology and Decision Processes at the University of Maryland provides a set of helpful guidelines in web-survey design. The basic principles all have to do with presenting the survey in a user-friendly way.

Some helpful pieces of design advice include:

  • Putting your logo at the top left of the page and the navigation menu vertically, on the left side of the page.
  • All questions and answers should be left-aligned.
  • The response format should be positioned to the left of all response categories.

Besides these, it’s always a good idea to use design elements that encourage easy reading since your users/survey respondents will be scanning the length of the page to read the questions and, hopefully, complete the entire survey.

Further good practices include:

  • Using enough white space between the individual questions so users can focus on one question at a time without feeling like they have to squint or try hard to guess what the question is asking.
  • Using a size of font that’s easily readable on the web, especially on smaller screens for mobile; according to research from UXmatters, that would at least be 4-point for small mobile devices and 6-point for bigger mobile devices.
  • Using, if possible, numbers and/or bullet points to further break up the questions into smaller, more easily digestible chunks of text that’s easier to skim.

Overall, the web survey you design should be a joy to move through and answer—not a detestable chore that your users won’t finish.

POINTS TO CONSIDER

Web surveys can be an effective tool to get feedback from users, readers, clients and consumers of any given site. The catch is that they have to be designed for usability, so the respondents don’t abandon the survey before completion. You want good, usable data from any survey that you create!

So remember some important guidance:

  • Definitely use images, but be choosy and only use those relevant to survey respondents.
  • Always design your survey for mobile since more and more people use mobile even to answer surveys these days.
  • Follow basic UX principles to ensure survey readability and usability.

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]