Captain Read an inspiration – Barrett

Cape Town – All Blacks pivot Beauden Barrett admitted to drawing inspiration from the performance of his captain, Kieran Read, during Saturday’s win over the British and Irish Lions in Auckland.

Read was in fine form in his side’s 30-15 triumph as he returned to action after a two-month lay-off after recovering from a broken thumb.

“I don’t know how he did it,” said Barrett.

“How his match fitness was up to it, all his skills required to compete at that level, it was inspirational. Particularly that pick-up from the scrum that was world-class which led to a try. That’s all we ask from a leader and it’s hard not to follow that.”

Barrett featured in a piece of class himself when running back in defence to field a Lions kick ahead. Not dropping his speed at all he bent down and scooped up the ball in one action.

He said he surprised himself in doing that because it wasn’t something he had done before and said he generally wasn’t the most flexible of players.

Barrett had only about 25 minutes at flyhalf in the game after having to move back to fullback when Ben Smith left for a concussion test which he ultimately failed.

Barrett said the change involved a slightly different view of the game when moving back to full-back. But once phase play was involved there was not a lot different.

“It’s a lot easier starting at 10 and moving back (to fullback) than it would be starting at 15 and going in,” he added.

[Source”timesofindia”]

Fujitsu Primergy TX1310 M1 – the workhorse Xeon server for SMEs on a budget

Image result for Fujitsu Primergy TX1310 M1 - the workhorse Xeon server for SMEs on a budget

Fujitsu Primergy TX1310 Specs

  • Fujitsu PRIMERGY TX1310 E3-1200 3.3GHz Xeon v3 supporting ECC memory – Up to 32 GB ECC memory (2 DIMMs) – 4 x 3.5 inch storage bays with RAID controller (not hot pluggable)
  • screwless chassis with easy rails
  • bay for backup drive
  • 4 PCIe slots – Dual Gigabit LAN ports
  • 8 x USB (4 x USB 3.0)
  • integrated graphics or optional Fujitsu VGA card

Fujitsu Primergy TX1310 Price

RRP: £499 (£349 on special, inc VAT)

Fujitsu Primergy TX1310 M1 – the workhorse Xeon server for SMEs on a budget

Can any more be said about small business servers these days? Normally we’d say not, but Fujitsu’s Xeon E3-1226-equipped Primergy dumped itself on our testing desk with a startling price tag of only £499 (£349 on promotion at eBuyer inc VAT) piquing our interest.

On the face of it, a small business is getting a lot for its CAPEX budget with this system, even once the cost of support and a volume OS license is added to the final bill. Within Fujitsu’s extensive line-up of tower servers, the TX100 series is the entry-level system, with the TX1310 occupying the middle of three tiers within that.

The TX1310 system supplied had 8GB of DDR3 1600HMz RAM in a single module (the Fujitsu site specifies 2 x 4GB for some reason), with a single spare slot on the motherboard, the maximum being 32GB. Frankly, this need to be doubled unless it’s being used for a basic tasks such as a print server, although the cost mentioned above includes that spec.

Fixed storage was in the form of 2 x 500GB SATA 6GB drives configured for RAID 1 mirroring and a DVD-RW drive, eight USB sockets, four being USB 3.0, two of which were at the front of the unit. Again, upping this to 2 x 1TB drives would be advisable (also included in the above price), which offers 1TB of capacity with RAID. Other features include the Intel I350-T2 Ethernet LAN card with dual Gigabit ports and on/off switches on the front and rear of the case.

The system ships with Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard pre-installed with Fujitsu ServerView Suite.

 

[Source:- Techworld]

Snapchat vs Instagram – Which Platform is Better for Your Brand?

Who Will Win the Battle between Snapchat & Instagram? | Social Media Today

Snapchat vs. Instagram: A rivalry as old as time. Well, almost.

There have been a lot of discussion this year about who’ll eventually win the battle between the two social media giants, and while out of the gate it looked like Snapchat would eventually be declared the victor, Instagram has been leading a charge to take some of Snapchat’s best features and… well, copy them.

However you slice it, these two platforms are what many think are the future of social media. In this post, we want to break down what each platform is, and more importantly, what it can offer to brands who are looking to connect with their ideal consumers.

By The Numbers

As of the end of 2016, Snapchat is seeing 150 million active users every day. They’re also reportedly serving 10 billion daily video views, while users, on average, are logged into Snapchat for 30 minutes every day.

Instagram, meanwhile, now has more than 600 million registered users, with more than 300 million of them logging into the app daily. For brands looking for engagement, it doesn’t get much better than that, especially among the younger populations.

Both Snapchat and Instagram have major appeal among people users age 35 and under – researchers have found that up to 90% of Instagram’s users are 35 and under, while 86% of Snapchat users are under the age of 34.

Which Platform Do Millenials Prefer?

Wishbone recently conducted a survey asking users between the ages of 12 and 25 (the coveted heart of the Millennial target group) which they preferred, Snapchat or Instagram. Here are their decidedly unscientific, yet still interesting, results:

 

 
[Source:- Socialmediatoday]

Eleven Windows 10 problems – and how to fix them

Stop tearing your hair out and follow our tips

Microsoft’s new operating system has – rightly – earned acclamation: Windows 10 takes a great step forward from the rock-solid and much-loved Windows 7, and it goes a long way to fixing the stumble that was Windows 8. Now we’ve all had a chance to live with it for a few months, though, its imperfections and foibles have had time to surface. Whether it’s the irritation of an extra screen at login, privacy concerns such as Wi-Fi Sense, or the frustration of not being able to upgrade in the first place, here are the ten biggest Windows 10 problems, and how to fix them.

1 – Can’t upgrade from Windows 7 or Windows 8

We could write a book about the problems people report with the upgrade to Windows 10. From the Get Windows 10 (or GWX) app reporting that perfectly viable computers aren’t compatible, through the app never appearing in the first place, to stalled and failed downloads. If you’ve got a PC still stubbornly clinging to Windows 7 or Windows 8, there are a few things to try:

  1. Open Control Panel, run Windows Update and ensure that the PC is fully up to date. If updates fail, run the Windows Update Troubleshooter (see below, number 3)
  2. Use the Media Creation Tool. Don’t rely on GWX: visithttps://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10, click Download tool now, save the tool and run it on the PC you want to upgrade. If this didn’t work for you back when Windows 10 launched, try it again now – the tool has been improved.
  3. Make sure that hardware Disable Execution Prevention (DEP) is switched on in the BIOS, referring to your motherboard manual for help if you need it. If you still have problems, use the Start Menu to search for ‘performance’, run Adjust the appearance and performance of Windows, click the Data Execution Prevention tab and turn DEP on for all programs and services, then reboot and try again.

2 – Can’t upgrade to the latest Windows 10 version

Windows 10 got a significant update (the Windows 10 Fall update) in November, but many computers have failed to install it automatically. From the Start Menu, type ‘winver’ and hit Enter. The latest build number is 10586.XX: if you’re still on 10240 you’ve missed out.

You can try troubleshooting Windows Update (see below), but in our experience, it’s best to use the Media Creation Tool. Download it and use it to upgrade the PC. Note that you’ll see a ‘Ready to install’ screen that, worryingly, doesn’t mention anything about an update: this is correct, just check that the installer is about to install the correct Windows 10 version (Home or Pro) and that it’s set to keep personal file and apps, then click Install – your data, apps and (almost) all of your settings will remain untouched.

3 – Windows Update isn’t working

Many people have reported issues with Windows Update in Windows 10. Check first that you’ve upgraded to the Windows 10 Fall update (see above, number 2). If you’re still getting problems, download and run the Windows Update Troubleshooter, then reboot and try to update again.

If the problems remain, you might need to get a bit more stuck in. First, check that System Restore is configured (see below, number 7) and create a restore point. With this done, use Win+x and select Command Prompt (Admin), then type ‘net stop wuauserv’ (without the quotes) and hit Enter, followed by ‘net stop bits’ and Enter. You should see confirmations that each service was either stopped or wasn’t running. Next, open Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution, and delete its contents including any sub-folders. Now reboot, open Windows Update and click Check for updates.

4 – Turn off forced updates

If you’re anything like us, you set up previous Windows releases so that they wouldn’t install updates automatically – one forced reboot is one too many. To be fair to Microsoft, Windows 10 handles post-update reboots much more elegantly, but we’d still rather be in control from the outset.

There is a workaround for users running Windows 10 Pro: from the Start Menu, search for ‘gpedit’ and run the Group Policy Editor. Expand Computer Configuration in the left-hand pane, and navigate to Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Update. Double-click Configure Automatic Updates in the list, select the Enabled radio button, and in the left-hand box select 2 – Notify for download and notify for install. Now click OK, and you’ll be notified whenever there are updates – unfortunately, they’ll be a daily irritation if you’re using Windows Defender.

The Group Policy Editor isn’t available on Windows 10 Home, but we’d recommend you at least open Windows Update, click Advanced options and select Notify to schedule restart from the Choose how updates are installed list. While you’re here, all Windows 10 users might want to click Choose how updates are delivered, and ensure that Updates from more than one place is either off, or set to PCs on my local network.

5 – Fix privacy and data defaults

We’re not a fan of some of the data-sharing defaults in Windows 10, and we’d recommend all users review them periodically. Use the Start Menu to search for and run the Settings app, then click Privacy. In the left-hand pane you’ll see many areas where your computer might be sharing data. It’s worth spending time checking that you’re comfortable with allowing apps to use your computer’s camera, microphone, account information and so on, and where you are, checking that no surprise apps appear in the lists. Note, too, that the default Feedback & diagnostics setting is to send enhanced data to Microsoft.

If you use Windows Defender, click the back arrow and select Update & Security, then Windows Defender. Check that you’re happy with the default behaviour, which is to enable Cloud-based detection and Automatic sample submission.

Many people are uncomfortable with the idea of Wi-Fi Sense, which is designed to get you onto wireless networks more quickly. On a device with Wi-Fi, click the back arrow, select Network & Internet, click WiFi and select Manage WiFi Settings. We’d strongly recommend turning off Connect to suggested open hotspots, Connect to networks shared by my contacts, and disabling the button under Paid WiFi services if it’s present.

Additionally, Wi-Fi Sense might result in the sharing of your network’s wireless credentials among devices you don’t control: allow a guest to log in and their contacts – and potentially theirs in turn – may also be able to. Ridiculously, the only fix is to rename your network’s SSID so that it ends with “_optout”. We’d recommend confining guests to a guest wireless network, configuring your own devices not to use Wi-Fi Sense, and asking staff to do the same before allowing their Windows 10 devices onto the main wireless network.

6 – Where’s Safe Mode when you need it?

Nothing gets you out of Windows trouble like Safe Mode, which is why it’s inexplicable that you can no longer enter it by pressing F8 or Shift+F8 at boot. Although it’s still available in Windows 10, you have to boot into Windows first, then either restart holding the left Shift key or via an option within Update & Security in the Settings app. Neither method is helpful if your PC can’t boot into Windows in the first place.

You can’t get around this, which is why it’s helpful to create a boot time Safe Mode option before trouble arrives. Hit Win+x and select Command Prompt (Admin), then type bcdedit /copy {current} /d “Windows 10 Safe Mode” and hit Enter. From the Start Menu type msconfig, run System Configuration in the results, and navigate to the Boot tab. Highlight the Windows 10 Safe Mode option you just created, tick Safe boot and select Minimal under Boot options and – if necessary – reduce the Timeout value so you won’t be inconvenienced – the minimum is three seconds. Tick Make all boot settings permanent (in fact you can simply return here to delete the Safe Mode entry) and click OK.

 

You can repeat these steps, substituting suitable names in quotes at the Command Prompt, to create shortcuts for Safe Mode with Networking (tick Network rather than Minimal in System Configuration) and Safe Mode with Command Prompt (Alternate shell).

7 – Enable System Restore

Another inexplicable choice in Windows 10 is that System Restore isn’t enabled by default; we wouldn’t hesitate to turn it on. Search for ‘Create a restore point’ in the Start Menu and select it in the results, then highlight the system drive, click the Configure button and select Turn on system protection. Use the slider to set an appropriate amount of maximum disk space – about 5GB ought to be enough. Note that, annoyingly, the upgrade to Windows 10 version 10586 turns this off again – you’ll need to turn it back on.

8 – Bad localisation, Cortana ‘not available’

Windows 10’s localisation options seem needlessly convoluted, and we’ve had multiple reports of incorrect localisation even in computers that were upgraded from correctly localised Windows 7 or Windows 8 installations. The most common issue seems to be dates in the American format MM/DD/YY, but Windows can also report that Cortana isn’t available, even in regions where it is.

From the Start Menu, search for region and choose Region & language settings. Check that United Kingdom is selected under Country or region, and check that your chosen language(s) appear under Languages. Select your primary language, click Options and click Download under the language pack, and speech options if they’re present. Check on this page that the keyboard is also correct – if it isn’t, add the correct one then select the wrong one and remove it.

 

Click the back arrow and select Additional date, time & regional settings. Under Language, click Change input methods, select your chosen language, move it to the top of the list if it isn’t there already, and click Options. Under Windows display language you might see either Enabled or Available – if the latter, click Make this the primary language. If you don’t see either, download and install the language pack, then make it the primary language.

Click the back arrow to return to the language preferences, and in the left-hand pane click Change date, time, or number formats and check that the format is set to the correct language. Check the Home location on the Location tab, and finally use the Administrative tab to check the System locale, and use the Copy settings button to apply the settings to the Welcome screen and new user accounts.

9 – Fix slow boot times

Like Windows 8 before it, Windows 10 uses a hybrid boot to enable fast boot times. When you shut the system down, apps and app processes are terminated, but the Windows kernel itself is hibernated to allow for a faster restart. In theory it’s great, but it seems to still be very slow for some Windows 10 users.

Disable it by searching for Power Options in the Start Menu and running the matching Control Panel applet, then in the left-hand pane click Choose what the power buttons do. Click Change settings that are currently unavailable, scroll down and un-tick Turn on fast start-up, then click Save changes. This should prevent very slow starts on affected PCs. Some users report that if they subsequently reboot, re-trace their steps and re-enable fast start-up the problem remains cured.

If you’re dual-booting between Windows 10 and Windows 7, switching fast start-up off will also fix the problem where Windows 7 checks the disks each time you boot it: With fast start-up enabled, the earlier operating system doesn’t recognise that the disks have been properly shut down by Windows 10.

10 – The lock screen gets in the way

Return to a locked Windows 10 device and you’ll see a pretty picture. That’s nice, but it’s a needless obstacle in the way of logging in. If you’re as impatient as we are, disable the lock screen by searching the Start Menu for regedit, and running the Registry editor.

Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows. If you don’t already see a key named ‘Personalization’, select the Windows key, right-click it, choose New>Key and rename this new key to Personalization (sic). Right-click the Personalization key, choose New again then select DWORD (32-bit) Value. Select New Value #1 in the right-hand pane and use F2 to rename it NoLockScreen, then double-click it, change the value data to 1 and click OK. After a reboot, the lock screen will be gone.

11 – I can’t play a DVD!

Windows 10 shipped without an app to play DVDs on. Which is not great if you like to watch movies on your PC.

Luckily, Microsoft has released an app as a download. Trouble is it costs £11.59. It also has garnered an overall rating of just two stars. Alternatively, you can download VLC, which is free and works just as well if not better.

[Source:- ITpro]