Trust Science to Help You Build Your Personal Brand

Trust Science to Help You Build Your Personal Brand

Your brain is hardwired to devour visual information. In fact, neurons that process visual information make up 30 percent of the cerebral cortex — compared with 8 percent to decode input from your sense of touch and 3 percent devoted to sorting out auditory cues.

You can’t control the resources your brain allocates to processing what you see. It doesn’t even matter whether you’re particularly interested in the image you’re viewing. Your brain is working to make sense of visual messages. Once it’s completed that work, the frontal lobe takes over. Your higher mental functions kick in, and your brain begins making judgments about what you’ve just seen.

Translate all this neuroscience to the business world, and you’ll realize that your clients and potential customers are judging your personal brand’s appearance, too. Ideally, your identity should accomplish three things: accurately represent your message, convey quality and encourage consumers to take your desired action.

Where to start?

What reaction do you want to trigger in people who come in contact with your personal brand? Should they follow you on social? Hire you for speaking engagements or professional services you provide? Download a white paper? Subscribe to your email list?

While all might be favorable goals, one must emerge as the most important. Decide on that priority outcome, and allow it to guide every choice you make as you develop your brand identity.

 

How can visual cues translate to text?

Next, you’ll choose colors and fonts. These elements should give the correct impression of your brand and reinforce your desired action. You don’t need to go back to the color wheel and start from scratch. Most likely, you already know which colors you like. If you’re not already familiar with the basics of color psychology, do a little research online. You’ll find plenty of reputable marketing resources have invested time and money to understand which hues produce certain emotions in most people.

 

Keep your text uncluttered by sticking with one font for headings and another regular body copy. It’s common to select a sans serif font — without the “little feet” that finish off each letter’s strokes — for headings. League Spartan or Open Sans are a few solid choices. Serif fonts tend to be more readable in longer passages, which is why they are a natural fit for everything else. View samples of Baskerville, Georgia and Times New Roman to get a feel for how they compare.

What impact can colors and fonts really make?

Your color and font choices must do much more than stand up on a static page. You’ll need to try them out in dynamic applications, too. Here’s an example of two “Subscribe” buttons. They appear on identical landing pages, with only the shade of red adjusted to gauge reaction.

 

 

[Source:- Entrepreneur]

 

Third party speakers may help Google Home take on Amazon Echo

google home 3-Google IO 2016

As we gear up to Google’s launch event in San Francisco next week, eyes are not only on the company’s new line-up of Pixel phones, but also on the extended range of smart home accessories expected to be on display. Google Home, a WiFi-connected smart speaker, could turn out to be one of the more important announcements made at the event, as Google prepared to ramp up its efforts in the smart home space and prepares to take on the increasingly popular Amazon Echo.

HiFi audio sales have been rejuvenated by the introduction of wireless Bluetooth and WiFi systems, and the early success of Amazon’s Echo suggests that there’s a growing consumer appetite for tying these systems in with virtual assistant and smart home products. Amazon has reportedly already sold 3 million Echo speaker systems this year, and is aiming to ship 10 million units in 2017. Google clearly does not want to be left behind, and already has an extensive ecosystem of virtual assistant based technologies, including search and app integration, that Google Home will be able to make use of.

According to a report by Variety, Google has been in talks with manufacturers to begin building other devices that will work just like Google Home. Apparently, details were discussed at a closed-door talk with some 50 participant from the home audio market. This suggests that we may end up seeing smart speakers from a variety of manufacturers, all powered by the Google Home could-based assistant.

 

Iportantly, another source alleges that Google may not allow these companies to combine their hardware with other virtual assistance, not that this demand is particularly uprising. Although manufacturers may be reluctant to put all their eggs into Google’s technology. However, some of the companies involved are said to have already worked with Google to produce speakers powered by Google Cast, a list which includes major brands such as Sony, Philips, LG, JBL, and Bang & Olufsen. However, Google has declined to comment on whether it will be working with any third-party manufacturers on this.

Google Home was originally announced back at I/O 2016, so we already know quite a bit about it. The little hub integrates a built-in Bluetooth speaker and microphone, which is paired up with Google Assistant to answer questions and respond to commands. The system is also integrated with Cast, so consumers can launch audio from compatible devices and apps, including Spotify, Tunein, Pandora, and more. Cast capabilities also mean that customers will be table to launch YouTube videos and other steaming services on their TV just by issuing a command to Google Home.

Essentially, Google Home is the company’s big play to bring its mobile assistant services to the home. Google’s portfolio of smart products may also assist the company in catching up with and leapfrogging Amazon Echo. Nest technologies have been incorporated to work on the project, opening up the possibility that other products around the home could be controlled from your speaker system.

According to an insider at the meeting, companies may be ready to unveil speakers with built-in Google Assistant integration as early as next summer. 2017 could be the year that smart homes really hit the mainstream.

 

 

[Source:- Androidauthority]