Apple Leak ‘Confirms’ iPhone 8 Is Massive

Supersized smartphones is clearly the trend of 2017: massive new displays crammed inside phones with super skinny bezels. And the iPhone 8 looks set to make the biggest leap of them all…

Following multiple design leaks and cases sent to me from third parties, new information from Weibo (via Slashleaks) again illustrates exactly how Apple AAPL -1.43% will radically enlarge the iPhone in 2017.

iPhone 8 design with enlarged display based on leaked leaks. Image credit: iDrop News

iDrop News

iPhone 8 concept with massive new display based on multiple leaks. Image credit: iDrop News

As you see below the new leaked protective panels (like leak after leak in recent weeks) perfectly matches renders, schematics and third party cases – some of which are already on sale showing the level of confidence Apple’s peripheral partners have.

iPhone 8 leaks continue to consistently match leaked cases, schematics and renders

Weibo

iPhone 8 leaks continue to consistently match leaked cases, schematics and renders. Image credit: Weibo

And what all these cases, images and schematics show is a dramatic shift from the 4.7-inch iPhone 7 to a 5.8-inch iPhone 8. This 1.1-inch increase is larger even than Samsung’s jump from 2016’s Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge to the new ‘Infinity Displays’ on the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus.

That said it is expected iPhone 8 users will lose some of this extra space to a new ‘Function Area’, a bottom notification and shortcut area in iOS 11 which will replace the home button and space lost to the ‘cut-out’ on the top bezel which houses the front facing camera and sensors. Regardless it is a dramatic size increase.

Concept of the iOS 11 'function area' for the iPhone 8 which is expected to be used for contextual controls and notifications. Image credit: iDrop News

iDrop News

Concept of the iOS 11 ‘function area’ for the iPhone 8 which is expected to be used for contextual controls and notifications. Image credit: iDrop News

Needless to say, sceptics will (perhaps correctly) point out it is only when Tim Cook holds the iPhone 8 aloft at its official unveiling that we can know these changes are 100% real. But I think we’re fast approaching a level of consistency and certainty (especially combined with the historical accuracy of leaks in recent years) where we can say this is what the new iPhone will look like.

In fact I’m calling it: this is what the new iPhone will look like.

iPhone 8 leaked schematic again matches perfectly. Image credit: Benjamin Geskin
[Source”indianexpress”]

Apple’s AR is closer to reality than Google’s

Apple has often been accused of acting like it invented things that others have been doing for years. That complaint is not without merit, however Apple can lay claim to transforming existing things into mainstream successes, which takes no small amount of invention in its own right. Fingerprint authentication and contactless payments are just two recent examples, having both existed in Japan and on niche devices for over a decade before Apple raised them to global prominence with the iPhone.

Next up on Apple’s agenda is augmented reality, the act of superimposing digital data and visuals atop a live video feed of your surroundings — something that Google, Microsoft, and many others have been experimenting with for a long time. Apple is far from being able to claim it invented AR, but its new ARKit in iOS 11 is already showing signs to suggest that Apple will help bring AR into the mainstream faster and better than anyone else.

The chronic problem with augmented reality has always been one of practicality. You could have the most basic forms of AR on your regular phone, as provided by apps like Layar, which has been around since 2009, but those have never been particularly compelling. Or you could have more sophisticated and appealing augmentations, as presented by Google’s Tango project, but you’d need a big fat phablet to lug around to make them happen. Apple’s difference is to combine the convenience of your daily phone with the appeal of advanced AR.

Follow

Made With ARKit @madewithARKit

Measure distances with your iPhone. Just because you can. Clever little #ARKit app by @BalestraPatrick ‍♂️ http://bit.ly/2sFl8RB 

Twitter Ads info and privacy

Looking at this distance-measuring app, it seems so simple and obvious. Of course your super-powered, multi-core phone should be smart enough to measure out basic distances, and there have indeed been many wonky apps trying to do that in the past. But measuring with AR, as already shown off by Google Tango phones, allows you a much more intuitive method for doing it. Having the phone actually aware of the three-dimensional space in its view allows for precise measurements, which can be represented with a neat hologram of a measuring tape. Apple’s advantage in the contest for doing this best is simple: while Google Tango demands special hardware, ARKit requires only that you have a recent iOS device. At WWDC earlier this month, Craig Federighi described ARKit as “the largest AR platform in the world,” and he was right.

Apple’s AR will immediately reach millions of people who already have the requisite hardware. And while it looks to be functionally as flexible and capable as Google’s Tango (check out some early examples of fanciful experiments with ARKit), its broader audience makes it much more enticing for serious developers to invest their time and money into. Google’s Tango is about the future whereas Apple’s ARKit is about the present.

Follow

Made With ARKit @madewithARKit

BOOM And just like that we have #ARKit measurement app number 2 http://bit.ly/2sbaNta  → by @laanlabs

Twitter Ads info and privacy

Considering how little time it took to develop two convincingly accurate AR measuring apps with the iOS 11 beta, and reading the comments from their makers, Apple also appears to have an advantage in the ease of development with ARKit. It’s exciting to think that there are still three months before the release of the next iPhone and the accompanying finalization of iOS 11, by which time Apple’s big-budget app developer partners are likely to have a deluge of AR-enabled apps for people to play with. That’s how stuff goes mainstream: as a big wave of change that touches everyone from casual Pokémon Go players to serious home DIY geeks figuring out how to arrange their living room furniture.

For the people who don’t care about incremental changes in phone specs or design, the differentiator between devices has always been in the unique things that each one can do — or, failing that, the convenience and ease of use of common features. Apple’s iPhone is more convenient than Google’s Project Tango devices and with iOS 11 it’ll have much better AR capabilities than its nearest premium Android rivals. So if we’re looking for the AR innovator that will take the technology into the mainstream, Apple once again looks like the likeliest suspect.

[Source”GSmerena”]

 

Why evolution is better than revolution in product design

featured_design

Digital products will always need to be redesigned. Styles progress, hardware technologies advance, and development possibilities are ever-increasing. Just in the past year the potential for implementing microinteractions, and processor-intensive animations and graphics, has come along at a fair pace. Product teams are continuously looking to iterate and stay ahead of or pass the competition. This is ever important in furthering the design and development industries, and delivering to the consumer the very best product available.

The process of redesigning is not always so straightforward. There are times when teams and individuals have to decide whether to redesign from the ground up, or iterate on the current product. In this article we are going to look at both options and analyze just why redesigning from scratch should be avoided in the majority of cases.

REDESIGNING FROM SCRATCH

To begin, redesigning from scratch should not always be avoided. On occasion, a company can inherit a product simply for the user base, domain name, or because they see the potential to completely re-engineer the product from the ground up, into something completely different.

One example of a product that completely redesigned from the ground up is Bebo. What was once a fast-growing social network has since become multiple new products as a result of complete redesigns. In its latest relaunch, it has been developed into a messaging app, somewhat reminiscent of Slack.

The issue with redesigning from scratch, is you pose the risk of alienating users. In certain cases, the product can have such underperforming design and UX, that it leaves this as the only appropriate course of action. The issue is when products are redesigned for little reason other than for change for its own sake.

It’s important to ask two questions when pondering this decision:

  • Does my vision for the product clash considerably with the current design and framework?
  • Is the current product posing multiple substantial design and UX issues for users?

If the answer to either is yes, then this may well be the most appropriate course.

If you believe a redesign may cause a loss of users, answering yes to either should override any worries you have of this being the case. Sometimes, and only sometimes, a small proportion of the existing user base who are entirely opposed to change has to be discounted in order to move the product forward. You just have to be sure you are truly moving the product forward with a complete redesign—there has to be clear underlying reasons such as above.

REDESIGNING IN ITERATIONS

For most cases, this should be the route to take. By continuously iterating on a product, you avoid alienating the current user base by by slowly but surely introducing new UI and UX enhancements with each version. This is a lot easier to digest for users, and typically helps avoid having them move to competitors. It also allows for the removal of a feature if proven not to be effective or useful for new and existing users.

Redesigning in iterations can also often result in the best possible product. When you are constantly redesigning from the ground up, it eliminates the positive effects of stepwise refinement.

Take Google’s core search product, for example. I’d argue they have never redesigned completely, and instead continuously iterated over multiple decades. With Google, they have an incredibly complex product, but a simple interface, and have iterated upon this in small steps to the point now where the product is extremely refined, powerful, and easy to use.

Another such example is InVision. A few years ago, they could have completely wiped the design which was looking tired and outdated. Instead of building something new with the latest short-term style trends, they chose to iterate on the current version one step at a time with the outlook of creating one of the finest design industry tools. All the while, they kept existing users satisfied by not overhauling every feature and layout.

In the above examples, you can see just how the product has progressed from something very dated, to a cutting-edge, industry leading product design—all through continuous iterating on the features, layout, and styles.

This approach also excludes the issue of overhauling a design every time the design team or lead is changed. It provides a consistent approach over long periods of time, and avoids individual designs and styles making their mark at the users’ expense.

Next time you are working on a design, ask yourself: should I really redesign this product from scratch, or can we achieve better long-term results with stepwise refinement?

 

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

Android 7.1.2 Nougat is official, public beta coming later today (Update 2: rolling out now)

Google has just officially announced Android 7.1.2 Nougat, and will begin rolling out the public beta build starting today!

Android 7.1.2 beta will roll out to Pixel, Pixel XL, Nexus 5X, Nexus Player and Pixel C devices who are enrolled in the Android Beta Program starting today, while the company says the Nexus 6P will get the update “soon.”

Of course, you probably shouldn’t expect a ton of new features to come along with this new update. Android 7.1.2 will be an incremental maintenance release focused on refinements, which will include a number of bug fixes, optimizations, and a small number of enhancements for carriers and users. That’s the only description Google gave for this new version of Android, so we’ll have to wait and see what specific changes it brings.

Google says if you’d like to test out this new version of Android ASAP, you should enroll in the Android Beta Program. And like always, if you have an eligible device that’s already enrolled, your device should receive the update in the next few days. If you haven’t enrolled yet, head to this website, opt-in your eligible Android phone or tablet, and that’s it. You’ll receive an OTA in just a few hours. And if you’d rather do things the old fashioned way, you can always download and flash the update manually.

The final, consumer-ready version of 7.1.2 will be released in just a few months for all the devices listed above.

 

[Source:- androidauthority]

 

The Moly X1 with Windows 10 Mobile is just $179 via Indiegogo

Image result for The Moly X1 with Windows 10 Mobile is just $179 via Indiegogo

The Moly X1 is an attractive phone running Windows 10 Mobile. The phone came out earlier this year but cost around $300 at the time. Now, the company is evidently running an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds and get the phone in more hands for a lower price.

The campaign has the phone with either US/Canada or Europe/Australia 4G LTE variants starting at just $179. From there the price goes up to $190 with a case and all the way up to $229 when the lower tiers run out.

The Moly X1 is a decent, low-cost phone especially for $179. While the camera is lacking the rest of the phone has a very elegant design as noted in our unboxing.

Here are the rest of the phone’s details:

Coship Moly X1 specifications

  • 5.5-inch HD or Full HD display with Gorilla Glass
  • 4G LTE support
  • 1.2 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 410 CPU
  • 2GB of RAM
  • 16GB internal storage with microSD expansion (14.5GB available)
  • micro-USB charging
  • 13MP rear camera with dual-LED flash
  • 5MP front camera
  • 2600mAh battery
  • Bluetooth 4.0 A2DP/HFP/OPP
  • Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n 2.4/5.0GHz
  • Sensors: G-sensor, Proximity sensor, Ambient Light sensor
  • Dimensions: 154.8 x 78.6 x 6.9mm
  • Weight 4.9 oz (139 grams)

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

The path to a Surface phone is clearer than ever with Windows 10 on ARM

Why does ARM on Windows 10 matter? What does it mean for a phone running Windows 10? Let’s break down Microsoft’s latest announcement to identify its implications.

Microsoft’s announcement of Windows 10 on ARM is a momentous occasion. Companies like Apple have been rumored since 2012 to be working on bringing macOS to ARM. Even just weeks before the MacBook Pro refresh rumors were swirling that Apple’s new laptops were ARM based. Yet it is Microsoft who is the first to do it for real (and not just for a Touch Bar).

To be clear, Windows 10 on ARM is about PCs and not phones. Nonetheless, the prospect that these two systems will come together is feasible. Here is how a Surface “phone” could happen, but first some background on why ARM even matters.

x86-64 versus ARM

ARM is the architecture used in modern smartphones. Whether it’s Apple’s A10 Fusion chip or Qualcomm’s Snapdragon line, these processors are all based on the ARM architecture. ARM differs significantly from x86 and x64, which is what Intel chips like ATOM, Core M, and Core i are based, as well as AMD’s processors.

Windows 10 Mobile runs on ARM; Windows 10 on x86-64. They share OneCore and UWP, but there’s a yawning gulf between the architectures.

Windows 10 Mobile runs on ARM; Windows 10 for PC runs on x86-64. Both share OneCore and UWP as their center of overlap. The difference is also why you cannot run x86 Win32 apps on your phone. Architecture matters.

Because ARM was made to be efficient for small batteries and reduced thermal loads, it’s ideal for smartphones and slim tablets.

Historically, ARM chips were significantly less powerful than desktop-class x86 processors. That’s been changing in the last few years. Apple’s A10 Fusion chip, found in the iPhone 7, is often compared in performance to the 2013 MacBook Air — which sported a 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 processor.

So, if ARM’s so fantastic, why not just put your desktop OS on it? The task requires a tremendous amount of engineering and work. Microsoft, evidently, has finished it. Apple is likely still working on something.

 

 

 

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

FACEBOOK IS PLANNING TO BET BIG ON VR IN THE NEXT DECADE

ANDROIDPIT VR glasses 2

The lawsuit

Oculus is facing a $2 billion lawsuit from ZeniMax over the creation of the technology that went into their VR headset. ZeniMax is a game publisher, and while you may not have heard of them, you may have heard of some of their games, like Fallout or Elder Scrolls. Some parts of this technology may have come from a former employee of the game publisher, and ZeniMax was never compensated for it. Zuckerberg went to the trial yesterday to testify for Oculus, which Facebook had acquired back in March 2014 for $2 billion plus another $1 billion more for milestones and employee retention. Zuckerberg, of course, denied the accusations and issued this sick burn after being asked by a ZeniMax lawyer about his reaction to the suit:

“It is pretty common when you announce a big deal or do something that all kinds of people just kind of come out of the woodwork and claim that they just own some portion of the deal. Like most people in the court, I’ve never even heard of ZeniMax before.”

Zuckerberg’s vision for VR

Zuckerberg gave us some strong hints about his vision for VR during the trial, and it seems to me that his plan for the technology involves three key components:

1. Improve quality of the VR experience

While he doesn’t think that “good virtual reality is fully there yet,” he does seem hopeful for the future, and more importantly, seems like he has a plan. He projected it would take five to 10 more years of development in order to “get to where we all want to go.”

2. Commit to long-term efforts

But, why will it take so long? He said, “These things end up being more complex than you think up front.” So it seems that the company knows it will have to make a larger long-term investment to reach its technical and adoption goals than it had initially planned.

3. Make a large monetary investment

Zuckerberg said during the trial that Facebook will probably have to invest over $3 billion in the next 10 years in order to give hundreds of millions of people a good virtual reality experience, which is the primary goal.

 

[Source:- AP]

 

What is the BBC micro:bit – Gary explains

microbit_pinout

The BBC micro:bit is part of an initiative to get kids coding, primarily in the UK, however its influence is starting to spread world wide. The micro:bit itself is a small credit card sized computer with an ARM Cortex-M0 microprocessor on it, plus a variety of sensors and LEDS. You can program it via MicroPython, JavaScript, a visual blocks editor, or in the C programming language. It is cheap, child friendly and has been given free to every child in year 7 or equivalent across the UK. So regardless of your age, if you find the prospect of learning to code interesting then read on to find out more in my full review of the BBC micro:bit.

History

There is a whole generation of computer scientists, software engineers, coders and hackers who first got into computing due to the home computer revolution of the mid-1980s and early 1990s. Machines such as the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, the Commodore 64 and the BBC Micro became the entry point for whole swathes of young people to learn about computing. Unfortunately as we entered the era of the PC and game consoles the “roll up your sleeves” attitude of the home computer revolution started to fade and in turn universities started to see a drop in the number of applications for computer science related studies.

This decline has been partly addressed by the great work of the Raspberry Pi foundation and now by the work of the Micro:bit foundation. You may have noticed the similarities between the name of the 1980s BBC Micro and the new BBC micro:bit. That is of course intentional. The British Broadcasting Corporation was a major partner in the release and the original BBC Micro and now the corporation is playing a significant role with the launch of the new micro:bit.

The micro:bit

The micro:bit itself measures 4 x 5 cm and includes 25 LEDs, 2 programmable switches, Bluetooth, an accelerometer, a compass, 5 ring type connectors and a 23-pin edge connector. This makes it ideal for not only learning about software but also for learning the fundamentals of electronics. The board can be programmed in a number of different ways including in Python and using JavaScript. The board is actually based on ARM’s mbed OS platform and the various programming environments offer higher level programming access. However the fundamental principle is the same: you write a program, compile it and then flash it onto the board. Once programmed the software on the board remains in the flash memory and will run whenever the board is powered on. This means that you can make standalone projects which just run whenever you power up the micro:bit.

 

Blocks

Probably the easiest introduction to coding for the micro:bit is using Microsoft’s micro:bit Programming Experience Toolkit (PXT). It supports both block-based coding and JavaScript. If you haven’t seen block-based coding before, the premise is very simple. The programmer uses drag-and-drop to pick blocks from a predefined set and stitch them together to make a program. Maybe picture will help:

 

On the left is a micro:bit emulator which demonstrates how the program will run on a real micro:bit. On the right is the program. There is a forever loop with two blocks inside of it. The first tells the micro:bit to scroll the message “Android Authority rulez!” and the second tells the micro:bit to pause for 1 second after the message has finished. Then the program will loop back and do it all again.

To add a new block you click on one of the menu items in the middle and then drag the desired block from the palette. The program in the screenshot above is for a very simple dice program (or should I say “die” as it is singular) that will display a random number between 1 and 6 when someone shakes the micro:bit.

There are blocks for controlling the LED matrix including showing strings, numbers and user-defined images. There are also blocks for reading the inputs like the compass and the accelerometer, plus blocks for all the normal programming stuff like conditions, loops, variables and simple arithmetic. On top of all that there are also blocks for controlling the input/output pins and even a way to do peer-to-peer communications using Bluetooth.

When you plug the micro:bit into your PC it will appear as a USB flash drive, called “MICROBIT.” To flash a blocks program onto the micro:bit you hit the download button and then drag-and-drop the resulting “.hex” file onto the MICROBIT drive. The micro:bit will automatically start the flashing process and then reboot when completed.

JavaScript

Microsoft’s micro:bit PXT also doubles as a Javascript editor. All block programs can be shown as JavaScript, in fact the block editor is just a front end to a JavaScript generator. If you modify the JavaScript the IDE will attempt to convert it back to blocks, however if it is too complex it won’t work and you need to continue in JavaScript only.

 

What this means is that if you are familiar with JavaScript, maybe because you have done some web development or maybe because you have used some of the popular JavaScript frameworks, then you can jump straight into micro:bit programming with little effort. It also means that if you have little or no programming skills then you can start to learn JavaScript using the micro:bit and you can use the blocks editor to help you get started. In either case it is a win-win situation!

Microsoft’s PXT editor isn’t the only way to write JavaScript for the micro:bit, you can also use the Code Kingdoms editor. Similar to Microsoft’s offering you can use blocks and JavaScript and switch between the two.

 

The only problem with the JavaScript approach is that the frameworks used by the two editors aren’t compatible. For example, to pause for 0.5 seconds under PXT you would use basic.pause(500) but under Code Kingdom’s IDE you need to use wait(500). The same thing applies to all the API calls related to the micro:bit including controlling the LED matrix, reading the button inputs, picking random numbers and even how to respond to events like shake.

This incompatibility will certainly be confusing to anyone just starting out and could cause frustration if an inexperienced user tries to switch from one environment to the other.

MicroPython

Python is a very popular high-level programming language that is often used to teach programming as it is simpler than languages like C and C++. MicroPython is a lean version of Python specifically designed to run on microcontrollers (like the ARM Cortex-M0 on the micro:bit).

There are several ways to code in Python on the micro:bit. One is to use the web-based IDE on the official micro:bit website, another is to use an offline editor like Mu. Mu is itself written in Python and works on Windows, OS X, Linux and Raspberry Pi. It is designed specifically for the micro:bit and also includes a built-in flash tool. Like the blocks editors and the JavaScript implementations, MicroPython for the micro:bit includes an API for controlling the hardware like the LED matrix and reading the inputs like the buttons.

 

C

mbed OS is ARM’s open source microcontroller development platform. It allows developers to build microcontroller based solutions using C and C++. The platform also includes everything you need to build IoT products and has a full networking stack along with support for Bluetooth. The micro:bit is in fact a mbed OS product, so while it is designed to be used by the higher level programming languages like JavaScript and Python, you can in fact program it via mbed in C and C++.

To program a micro:bit from mbed you first need to add the board to your setup and then import the micro:bit library into your project. From there you have access to some very low level classes and functions which provide a similar API to that of JavaScript and MicroPython. In fact if you study the mbed OS API you will see lots of similarities between what is available in the higher level languages and what is provided in the support library.

The screenshot above shows how to write the dice program in C++. As you can see it is a little longer than say the JavaScript version as you need to do more setup and handle things at a slightly lower level. This probably isn’t the best place for beginners to learn about the micro:bit. However if you have some C/C++ experience then this is a great way to explore the nitty-gritty of the platform.

Wrap-up

There is no doubt that the micro:bit is a excellent learning tool. It takes a different approach than the Raspberry Pi (which is also an excellent way to get into programming) since it doesn’t need a keyboard, mouse or monitor to use it. However you will need access to a PC for the coding and flashing. Well, actually that isn’t strictly true. It is possible to program the micro:bit from a smartphone or tablet. There are micro:bit apps available for Android and iOS. These apps basically take the place of the PC for the flashing process, which is done over Bluetooth rather than over a USB cable. However the programming environment offered within the app are actually just links to the online web environments.

The aim of the micro:bit is to encourage creativity in terms of software and hardware among young people and it certainly does just that. My kids are keen to play around with the micro:bit (now that the review is done) and I think that because the LED matrix is simpler to program than say sprites in a game on something like the Raspberry Pi then entry point is lower (which is a good thing).

If you are thinking about getting a young person a present which might actually be educational rather than just provide amusement, then you should certainly think about the micro:bit.

 

 
[Source:- Androidauthority]

The Ricoh R spherical camera is designed for 360-degree live streaming

Under the new “ruggedized” chassis are internals that mark an improvement on the predecessor in almost every way. The output stream is at 2K and 30 frames per second. The video can be stitched from the two fisheye lenses in real-time and use the EPF (Equirectangular Projection Format) standard for spherical streams. You can output the stream through HDMI or USB as well as stream directly to an SD card for offline use. For live-streaming, Ricoh says you’ll be able to run a stream for a full 24-hours as long as you supply power.

While still not quite photo-realistic VR, it gets close. The Ricoh R should make for a great way to stream 360 videos without spending thousands of dollars.

Developer kits are expected to ship later in 2017.

 

 

[Source:- androidcentral]

This new Microsoft design patent is unlikely to be the Surface phone

Patently Apple goes a bit heavy with the speculation especially since their earlier find from February shared some resemblance of what was eventually Surface Studio. I call that luck as most patent filings rarely become actual products. Back to this patent, no information about the features, hardware, or materials used are mentioned making the filing pretty basic.

Oddly, the Patently Apple author goes on a tangent about pens, Apple, Samsung, and how Microsoft could be bringing inking to Mobile (a forgone conclusion already). They then cite FIG. 7 with the following conclusion labeled in their image:

However, what we can clearly see is that a Surface smartphone is likely to support their Surface Pen. Like the Samsung Note-styled embodiment, a slot has been designed into the body of the design at the top.

Of course, to our eyes, it only looks like a standard 3.5mm headphone jack like the kind you used to find on every smartphone in the world. I’m not sure when we started confusing headphone jacks with pen slots. 2016 is a weird year, and I suppose Apple fans have already moved on from ‘headphone-gate’ by forgetting it ever existed? I dunno.

The bottom of the phone has a single port, which again looks like an old micro USB slot and not quite the symmetrical USB Type C design we are accustomed too.

Frankly folks, I don’t see anything interesting here. This design patent is a generic filing on what could easily be the Lumia 640. In fact, the patent cites Micromax, Sony Xperia, LG Optimus, Lumia 830, and the Lumia 530 – all phones from 2012-2014 – under ‘other publications’ for the patent’s references.

Microsoft has some exciting stuff in the pipeline for sure, but please don’t go spreading this around as ‘proof’ of a ‘Surface Phone.’ Facts and data are still necessary, not a generic drawing based on yesteryear’s inspiration.

 

 

[Source:- windowscentral]