GOOGLE PLAY SERVICES BATTERY DRAIN: HOW TO FIX IT

google play services battery 1

Google Play Services battery drain: how to spot it

The reason why Google Play Services could be the culprit is because for many apps it’s the key to the world of Google: it delivers your Gmail to mail apps, maps and location settings to mapping apps, ads to ad-based apps and so on.

If your trusty phone is suddenly suffering from terrible battery life, the culprit could be Google Play Services. Batteries do deteriorate over time, but it’s a gradual process: unless you’re spectacularly unlucky, a battery that was OK yesterday won’t suddenly discharge three times faster tomorrow.

The easy way to tell whether Google Play Services is draining the battery of your device is to pop into the Battery section of your Settings app. As you can see below on the left screenshot, just tap on Battery usage.

This shows you the biggest power hogs, and in most cases you should see the Screen listed at number one, which makes sense, given that it’s the most power-hungry part of your device. If Google Play Services is using more power than the display or more power than the Android System itself, something’s wrong. In the below screenshot on the right, you can see the list of power hogs.

Google Play Services battery drain: why it is happening and how to fix it

There are a number of reasons why Google Play Services might be using more power than you’d like. We’ve seen reports of Google Play Services eating battery life across versions 4.1.32 and 4.2, on devices running Cyanogenmod, on Lollipop and on KitKat. With so much variety there clearly isn’t a single solution to solve every problem on every device. But there are some things you can check.

As with any problem, we’re assuming you’ve already tried rebooting and that you have the most up-to-date software and firmware for your phone. If you haven’t, do those things first. They solve all kinds of issues.

  • Is Google Play Services eating battery because you have loads of accounts?

Play Services’ main job is to download things in the background. Those things could be your emails or the app’s ads, or notifications or checking your location to see if it needs to trigger a Google Now event. If your device is connected to multiple Google Accounts, for example because you have personal and work accounts or because you’re a spy or superhero with multiple identities, then Google Play Services is having to do all that for multiple accounts.

  • Is a third party app misusing Google Play Services?

If the battery drain is a recent development the problem might not be with Google Play Services but with one of the apps that uses it. Try booting into Safe Mode; if your battery problem goes away that’s a pretty big hint that the Google Play Services battery problem is down to a third party app.

  • Is Google encountering Sync errors?

Sync errors are when Google tries to synchronise data but can’t, for example because it can’t connect to a particular server. Problems with your data can also cause sync errors, so for example if something’s gone wrong with your contacts, calendar or Gmail that can cause Google to keep trying (and failing) to synchronise your local data with Google’s servers. Removing and re-adding accounts can solve persistent sync errors but before you do that, try disabling Mobile Data in Settings for a minute and then turning it back on again.

  • Is it your GPS?

When an app needs your location, it requests it through Google Play Services, which gets the information by using your GPS hardware. If you weren’t aware, using GPS takes up a lot of battery, and since Google Play Services facilitates this process, it can appear to be taking up the battery life when the GPS is really the culprit.

In the Battery usage screen we showed you how to get to before, tap on Google Play Services. On the detailed screen it shows you, scroll down until you see Location and tap it (like in the left screenshot below). You’ll then find three mode options, one of which is called Power saving. This mode doesn’t use GPS to retrieve your location, and is less accurate, but can save your battery life by only using your network and Wi-Fi information. If you find this setting to be too imprecise, simply switch it back to High accuracy later.

 

 

 

[Source:- AP]

Don’t like Windows 10? Here’s how to uninstall it

With Windows 10, Microsoft has made some massive changes to the way its operating system works, and it’s managed to win over a lot of people (IT Pro included).

However, it’s not been a hit with everyone. Some don’t like the new Start menu, there have been reports of compatibility issues, and many just aren’t comfortable with it. If you’re one of the people that wish they hadn’t upgraded, fear not – you can still go back to your old version of Windows.

Be warned, though – you’ll need to act fast. Microsoft has built a feature into Windows 10 allowing users to roll back to their previous Windows version, but it’s only available for the first ten days after you install the new OS. It’s still possible to go back to an older version after this period elapses, but it’s more difficult and time-consuming.

How to uninstall Windows 10 from automatic install

Although Microsoft has denied it, a number of Windows 7 users have complained that Windows 10 has begun automatically installing on their systems (even one of IT Pro’s staff left their home computer running one evening and returned to find the installation process had started).

If you’ve returned to your PC to find that it has somehow upgraded itself to Windows 10 without your consent, this tutorial will also apply to you.

Previously, once you switched (or your computer switched) to Windows 10, you had 30 days in which to convert back to your previous OS. Once you’ve installed the Anniversary Update, that time falls from 30 days to only ten days. Microsoft has said the change was made following “user research” that revealed most users reverted within the first several days, and shortening the time to 10 days frees up the 3GB to 5GB of storage space that was holding onto the previous OS.

When your PC upgrades to Windows 10, the old operating system is kept on the hard drive for around a month; after the Anniversary Update, that falls to just 10 days. This means that you haven’t got long to decide whether or not you like the new OS.

Before you do this, it is a good idea to make sure all data is backed up using either an external hard drive or a cloud-based backup service. You may also want to ensure your old Windows 7 or Windows 8 product key is to hand just to be doubly careful.

To roll back to your previous version of the OS, go to the Start menu and choose ‘Settings’, then ‘Update & security’. Choose ‘Recovery’ in the left-hand panel and, on the right, find ‘Go back to Windows 8.1′ or ‘Go back to Windows 7’. Click the ‘Get started’ button below that and follow instructions.

Once you have gone back to the old version of Windows, older programs may need to be installed.

Of course, this will only work if you still have the Windows.old folder (C:\Windows.old). If you can’t find it or you have deleted it, then you are out of luck.

A complete reinstall may be your only option if the rollback method described above is no longer available.

This can also have the effect of removing tons of bloatware that have clogged up your operating system, slowing it down.

A clean install is different from the Reset you PC option in Windows 8 and above. This can often re-install junkware that came from the manufacturer with the laptop.

This uses just the Windows media (CD or USB) and nothing else and should result in a faster PC as well. It is also a way of dealing with any malware-infected machines or those that have been riddled with ransomware and had data encrypted.

To perform a clean install, insert the Windows DVD into the disc drive or insert a USB containing the Windows installation media into a free USB port. Then turn on the computer (or restart it).

Look for Press any key to boot from CD or DVD or Press any key to boot from an external device. Pressing a key will force the computer to boot from either the Windows DVD or a flash drive with the Windows 8 installation files on it.

If you can’t find your old disc, as long as you have the product keys, you can download Windows installation media and burn the ISO file to a disc or copy it to a USB drive using Microsoft’s Windows USB/DVD download tool.

On a Windows 7 PC, look for a “certificate of authenticity” sticker with a key on it. It is normally on the underside of a laptop or at the back of a desktop PC. For Windows 8 PCs, the key can be embedded in your computer’s firmware. This means Windows 8.1 will automatically detect it and allow reinstallation of Windows 8.1 without even asking for a key.

 

 

[Source:- ITpro]

Windows 10 Anniversary Update makes it harder for admins to remove advertising

Microsoft has been accused of injecting ads and sponsored apps into Windows for quite a while and now they’re taking more direct steps to prevent users disabling them through Group Policies. Several Group Policies will be deactivated with the Anniversary Update, making it harder for IT-pros and system admins to prevent unwanted content.

When the Anniversary Update rolls out to current November Update users, there will no longer be a way to block the obnoxious ads that automatically pin themselves to your PCs start menu when you start it for the first time. In a network with all PCs connected to each other, there is a universal Group Policy that applies to every PC on the network, which means adding a new machine to the family will automatically adjust it; such as disabling the ads and sponsored apps on all new PCs, however, this change will prevent that. By disabling the Policies that take care of the advertising, system admins will have to manually remove the ads from every new PC they get.

This change doesn’t only apply to the start menu. As reported by InfoWorld, the lock screen can only be disabled on certain editions of Windows 10 from August 2nd: Enterprise, Education, and Server SKUs. This seems like an unrelated thing with no context, but Microsoft is actually, quietly, pushing ads to the lock screen too. With things like Tomb Raider and Cortana popping up there occasionally, this may be something users could want to disable but can’t anymore.

We will see how users of Windows 10 react to these changes once the Anniversary Update rolls out on August 2nd.

 

[Source: Winbeta]

Fresh Paint Windows 10 Preview lands in the Store but you can’t download it yet

For the artists among us, there’s a new app out on the Windows Store that might just help you unleash your inner creative: A preview version of Fresh Paint, the Windows 10 app that’s been around for a while now. While you should already have Fresh Paint installed by default, this new preview version is something else entirely. We don’t know precisely what the purpose of this app is, and it doesn’t help that we currently have no way of getting it.

The preview version of Fresh Paint, while having a listing up on the Windows Store, can’t be downloaded just yet. On top of this, its description is entirely barren, only giving out the basic two sentence description of the app: “The delightfully realistic painting application for you, your friends and family. It’s time to set your creativity free!”

This listing on the Windows 10 Store is, at the time of writing, sort of an anomaly. If it ever becomes something that we can download, however, it’s fair to assume it could have a few extra features that Fresh Paint users would want to get their hands on. For those curious, check out the app listing via the download link below. We’ll let you know once the app becomes available for download.

 

[Source:- Winbeta]

IT Security Teams Are Stretched to the Limit

Heterogeneity Rules

The growth of virtualization and cloud computing—and the nimble and responsive architectures they enable—has brought companies unquestioned benefits, ranging from increased business agility to reduced application costs. But the heterogeneous environments most companies are now overseeing also have brought unprecedented complexity and vulnerability. With so many sub-environments and so much cross-application traffic to monitor—not to mention an increasingly sophisticated and fast-growing population of bad guys to safeguard against—it’s become difficult for enterprises to even detect a threat, much less respond in a timely fashion. Such is the inescapable takeaway from a recent survey that the SANS Institute conducted for adaptive security vendor Illumio. “When it comes to limiting damage and preventing data breaches, time continues to be the biggest challenge for security and risk professionals,” said SANS analyst Dave Shackleford, author of “The State of Dynamic Data Center and Cloud Security in the Modern Enterprise” report. “If our security stance is going to improve, we need better visibility, the ability to make configuration changes faster and to contain attacks more quickly.” The survey polled 430 security and risk professionals from the SANS community.

[Source:- Eweek]