NOT YOUR REGULAR KIND OF GAMING MOD!

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I’m telling you, we may have accidentally (we’re not sorry) triggered a modularity revolution! There’s absolutely no shortage of modular concepts and if nothing, we’ve seen more than a fair share in the past few weeks (take for example this modular microphone concept, or these modular shoes that we love, or even this DIY modular smartphone).

The EXEO is the next in the series of “things made modular”. This series of concept controllers for console gaming are designed to be used individually as Nintendo Wii-esque hand-held modules. Designed for separate purposes, the Velox, Brutus, and Terra make rather useful controllers for various scenarios. However, things get interesting when they pair up, allowing you to make more complex instruments of gaming, from bike-handlebars, to an F1 steering wheel, to a joypad, and to even a massive plasma shotgun. My personal favorite however is the assembly for archery, that uses 3 Velox modules and one Brutus module.

All modules smartly fit into one another, recognizing what they’re being crafted into when you plug them together. Not only do they come with controls on them, they even include feedback lights, that totally uplift your gaming experience. Let’s hope Nintendo makes this dream come true!

Designer: Sushant Vohra

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[Source”indianexpress”]

‘Sahara Life should not procure new business’

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15 5hrs Modi arrives in Portugal on first leg of 3-nation visit
1 1hr Vested interests hijacked M.P. stir: Shivraj Singh Chouhan
2 1hr Id festivities turn sour for Faridabad family
3 1hr Vaghela slams Congress party high command
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‘Sahara Life should not procure new business’
SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT HYDERABAD, JUNE 23, 2017 21:05 IST
UPDATED: JUNE 23, 2017 21:13 IST
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th24BUSAHARA
Someone filling out Restraining Order.
IRDAI order allows company to service existing business

Insurance regulator IRDAI, which earlier this month had appointed an administrator to manage the affairs of Sahara India Life Insurance, on Friday directed the company not to procure new business.

The company is directed “not to procure/collect proposal deposits/underwrite new business with immediate effect, i.e., close of business on June 23, 2017,” the regulator said in its order.

Advising Sahara India Life to inform all concerned such as agents and intermediaries of the direction, it said the company should ensure that it did not conduct new insurance business immediately on receipt of the order.

However, the company is directed to “continue to collect and account for renewal premium; and service the existing business and policyholders, unhindered,” the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India said.

IRDAI had on June 12 appointed its General Manager (F&A-NL) R.K.Sharma as administrator of the company and asked him to file a report on the most advantageous course of action in the interest of the policy holders. There were reasons to believe that Sahara India Life “is acting in a manner [that is] likely to be prejudicial to the interests” of the policy holders, the regulator had stated.

[Source”pcworld”]

Yes, You Need a Pattern Library… Just Not Yet.

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Designer guilt.

I feel it all the time, I’m sure you do too. I feel this guilt when I fail to do something that the design community has insisted that all designers must do.

When I jump right into high-fidelity prototypes, I feel guilty. When I rely too much on my own assumptions rather than user insights, I feel guilty. And, when I fail to start a pattern library at the outset of a new project, I feel guilty.

For the first two points, sure, you should feel guilty. These are best practices for reasons I won’t get into here. (Don’t believe me? Take a look here, and here.)

But should you feel guilty for not starting a pattern library?

I’ve realized that the answer is No. You shouldn’t.

I’m not suggesting you don’t need a pattern library at some point. You do. Just maybe not right now. In fact, creating an obligatory pattern library too early in your project could be slowing down your process.

How? Well, at the beginning of a project it’s beneficial to be a little messy. Keeping things loose is key to a Lean UX process as you test assumptions to determine what your users need. Now is not the best time to focus on your pattern documentation.

After a while, though, the strain of not having a pattern library will set in. You’ll know that it’s time to start investing in your pattern library when these four signs emerge:

YOU’RE HAVING THE SAME DISCUSSIONS OVER AND OVER AGAIN

Developers will often tell you they abide by the principle of DRY — Don’t Repeat Yourself. This keeps their code clean, and free of redundancies.

Pattern libraries can help product teams follow this principle as well.

By the time we were a few months into building our app, my team was feeling a sense of deja-vu when discussing our designs. What pattern do we use for opening a modal again? What should the text field look like on this page?

A shared pattern can help avoid these cyclical discussions. Now, when the question of what pattern to use comes up, we have a reliable point of reference.

YOUR TEAM IS REFERRING TO THE SAME PATTERNS BY FIVE DIFFERENT NAMES

“Let’s use the modal that fades as it shoots up and has a typeahead search field.”

Yes, I said this in a meeting. No joke. This was one of those moments when the stark realization of our need for a pattern library set in.

Pattern libraries can help create a common language across your team, and departments. When you say “frying pan”, you can assume I have the appropriate image in my head. In the same way, you could say “Modal List Picker” and your team will know exactly what you’re talking about.

SMALL INCONSISTENCIES ARE MOUNTING

It’s an unfortunate reality, but your app will have a few tiny fissures at the start. An outcast font here, some renegade margins there. That’s OK. You’re still figuring things out.

Over time, though, these tiny fissures begin to add up to more serious cracks in the user experience. Your app may start to feel unpolished, asymmetrical.

Malcolm Gladwell once wrote how people can detect fraudulent art within seconds. You don’t want to risk your users writing off your app in the same, unconscious manner.

The process of creating pattern library can help your team focus on identifying and fixing these inconsistencies before they get out of hand.

NEW TEAMS ARE WORKING ON THE PRODUCT

During the initial stages of a new product, it’s common for a small team to take complete ownership. This keeps everyone focused, so they’re able to react to customer needs and insights as fast as possible.

As the product grows, the amount of teams and contributors will grow as well. Without pattern documentation, new teams may rekindle the pattern debates you thought were over.

A pattern library can help in communicating the what, how and why behind your patterns to new teams and stakeholders.

It’s best to remember that pattern libraries are tools, not dogma. Yet, if you’re designing a product, you’ll feel the guilt. You’ll worry you’ve ignored practical advice and have let your team down.

That’s OK. It’s more important to take some big leaps of faith, watch your ideas fail, and keep on learning and iterating.

You’ll build a pattern library someday, don’t worry. The time will come when you can’t ignore strain. Best of all, it won’t feel like an obligation.

It’ll feel like an epiphany.

 

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

iPad Pro 9.7in review: Apple’s slick, superfast tablet could be another nail in the coffin of laptop culture… but it’s not perfect

iPad Pro 9.7in review

Welcome to Macworld’s iPad Pro 9.7in review for the UK. If you’d prefer a larger screen, read our iPad Pro 12.9in review.

Apple unveiled a new mid-size iPad at its ‘Let us loop you in’ March press event, as was widely expected, but what we didn’t expect was for this to be an iPad Pro. Rather than calling this the iPad Air 3, which it logically and visually appears to be, Apple is presenting it as a shrunk-down version of the 12.9in iPad Pro – and thereby attempting to position the new 9.7-inch iPad Pro as a work device suitable for replacing a laptop, and targeted particularly at designers and illustrators on the go.

But does it succeed? In our iPad Pro 9.7in review, we evaluate the latest iPad’s design and build quality, weigh up the pros and cons of its new features, put the device through the Macworld labs’ most rigorous speed benchmark and battery tests, and compare the value for money that the iPad Pro 9.7in offers compared to the other tablets on the market.

iPad Pro 9.7in review

iPad Pro 9.7in review: Summary of review

Design: Physically the iPad Pro 9.7 is a close match to the iPad Air 2: weight and dimensions are identical, as is the general design (which remains sumptuous, of course). You now get four speakers – two at the top, two at the bottom – and the bottom speakers are spaced slightly further apart. This results in a much fuller, richer sound – not exactly surround sound, but a far more immersive audio experience than we’ve come to expect from a tablet.

Cameras: One other noticeable physical change is the rear-facing camera, which now sticks out and will scratch on the desk if you lay the iPad flat on its back. Slightly annoying, that, although any sort of case will remove this issue, and you do get the payoff of a heavily enhanced camera setup. The rear-facing camera now has a flash, and has been pushed from 8 megapixels (on the Air 2 and the Pro 12.9in) to 12Mp; there are also numerous smaller improvements to this component.

The front-facing camera is even more dramatically boosted, going from 1.2Mp to 5Mp and gaining the Retina flash feature. We look at all this in more detail, and present a selection of test shots and comparisons, in the camera testing section, but suffice it to say that in some conditions you won’t notice the difference from the Air 2’s cameras, in others you’ll notice small improvements, and in others it’s in a whole different class.

Screen: The 9.7-inch touchscreen Retina-class display is in most respects the same as that on the Air 2: same size, same resolution and pixel density, same sharply responsive multitouch functionality. But it adds a new (and optional) feature called True Tone, designed to subtly adjust the screen’s colour output to account for environmental light conditions. And we do mean subtly – it’s a similar kind of idea to Night Shift, producing a warmer, yellower colour palette under electric lighting, but to a much less noticeable degree. We imagine most users will only be dimly aware that the screen seems to have good colour output without being sure why; we saw a clear difference only by sitting it next to the (non-True Tone) iPad Air 2 in various conditions.

Speed: Thanks to its A9X processor chip, the Pro 9.7 is significantly faster – at least on paper – than the Air 2, and in most tests very nearly as quick as the iPad Pro 12.9 despite having half as much RAM. For the time being you won’t notice much difference between the Pros and Air 2, but the older device is sure to get left behind as more and more processor-intensive apps and games are released with the newest generation of hardware in mind. s

Battery: Early battery testing was also impressive, with the Pro 9.7 lasting, surprisingly, 11hrs 11m in GeekBench 3’s highly demanding benchmark despite having slightly lower battery capacity than the Air 2 (which managed just 7hrs 40m) – although stay tuned for repeat tests. Both devices should last longer than that in general use.

iPad Pro 9.7in review

Accessories: Crucially for its credibility as a laptop replacement, the Pro 9.7 has launched alongside a new keyboard case, a 9.7in version of the Smart Keyboard, and like the Pro 12.9 it features a port on its lefthand edge for connecting to and powering this accessory. It’s about as good as an ultraportable keyboard of its size could be, but nowhere near as accurate to type on as a conventional keyboard (and some way behind the larger 12.9 version of the Smart Keyboard, too). It does a job, but you’ll need to rely on either a solid autocorrect (like the one in Pages), frequent manual corrections, or just lots of practice.

You can also now use the Apple Pencil stylus, which is pretty wonderful, but expensive.

UK pricing: The Pro 9.7in starts at £499 in the UK, with prices rising to £839 for the 256GB cellular model. You’re paying a premium, then, and many Apple fans will baulk at the asking price. But we think there are enough enhancements here to justify it, and business users – if they can live with the smaller and harder-to-use keyboard attachment – will get a lot out of this device. It’s still a cool £180 cheaper than the Pro 12.9, remember, and that device doesn’t get the True Tone display or most of the camera upgrades.

That’s the summary of our iPad Pro 9.7 review, but let’s look again at each of those areas in more detail – before finally giving our definitive verdict.

iPad Pro 9.7in review
[Source:- Macworld]