Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 spec slides leak, DX12 support in tow

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Qualcomm’s upcoming Snapdragon 835’s specs have leaked ahead of its CES reveal.

The first Windows 10 on ARM devices will be powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835, set to debut at CES 2017 this week. Videocardz.com have obtained some slides detailing the new chip’s capabilities, and they reveal significant improvements over its predecessors.

The above video shows Windows 10 running adequately on a Snapdragon 820, but it will run even better on the upcoming Snapdragon 835, which is more efficient and more powerful in various ways.

The Snapdragon 835 will feature smaller and more efficient transistors than its predecessors, and its smaller die will result in thinner devices with more room for larger batteries. The slides also detail how the Snapdragon 835 will be a superior option for various use cases, including app performance, web browsing, and VR.

Interestingly, the Snapdragon 835 will be the first 800-series Snapdragon to fully support the DX12 graphics API, which will coincide with the launch of Windows 10 on ARM in devices set to debut throughout 2017.

All of this bodes well for the future of Windows 10 on mobile devices, which will bring the power of a full PC to new form factors, including, more than likely, the fabled Surface Phone.

 

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 spec slides leak, DX12 support in tow

The first Windows 10 on ARM devices will be powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835, set to debut at CES 2017 this week. Videocardz.com have obtained some slides detailing the new chip’s capabilities, and they reveal significant improvements over its predecessors.

The above video shows Windows 10 running adequately on a Snapdragon 820, but it will run even better on the upcoming Snapdragon 835, which is more efficient and more powerful in various ways.

The Snapdragon 835 will feature smaller and more efficient transistors than its predecessors, and its smaller die will result in thinner devices with more room for larger batteries. The slides also detail how the Snapdragon 835 will be a superior option for various use cases, including app performance, web browsing, and VR.

Interestingly, the Snapdragon 835 will be the first 800-series Snapdragon to fully support the DX12 graphics API, which will coincide with the launch of Windows 10 on ARM in devices set to debut throughout 2017.

 

[Source:- windowscentral]

Google removing support for Chrome Apps in Mac browser by 2018

The company has declared that starting in late 2016, newly-published Chrome apps will only be available to users on Chrome OS. Existing Chrome apps will remain accessible on all platforms, and developers can continue to update them.

However, by the end of 2017, the Chrome Web Store will no longer show Chrome apps on Windows, Mac, and Linux. By early 2018, people on these platforms will no longer be able to load the apps at all.

All types of Chrome apps will remain supported and maintained on Chrome OS for the foreseeable future. Additional enhancements to the Chrome apps platform will apply only to Chrome OS devices.

Google claims that only one percent of Mac and Linux users actively utilize Chrome packaged apps. Developers are encouraged to migrate the apps to the Web, and invited to participate in a process to select APIs for migration.

 

 

[Source: Appleinsider]

Microsoft Outlook on Android updated with Android Wear support

Google’s Android Wear is the company’s wearable platform that’s supported by a wide range of manufacturers and devices. Essentially, Android Wear is the direct competitor to Apple’s Watch, or perhaps it’s more accurate to say that Apple’s Watch is the direct competitor to Android Wear, which actually came first. In any event, Microsoft has updated Outlook for Android with enhanced Android Wear support, making the company’s cross-platform support even better on Google’s platform.

Here’s the changelog straight from the horse’s mouth:

WHAT’S NEW

This week, we’re bringing the best of Outlook to Android Wear. Stop reaching out for your phone; everything is now happening on your watch.

Check your Outlook notifications, read your new emails and reply with pre-set messages or voice dictation right from your wrist. It’s never been that easy to manage your inbox.

So, if you’re using Microsoft’s email and calendar solution fo Android along with a Google Wear device, then you’ll be able to marry to two and enjoy the benefits of both. If you’re not using Outlook for Android and want to give it a try, you can download it from the link below.

 

[Source:- Winbeta]

Battleborn system requirements revealed, no 4K support at launch

Battleborn Hero art

2K Games has dropped a big Battleborn info dump that helpfully collects everything you ever wanted to know about the upcoming FPS/MOBA hybrid but were afraid to ask. Highlights include a rundown of Hardcore Mode, which ramps up the Story Mode with “extra loot, all new unlockable content, and some really, REALLY tough fights,” as well as a brief overview of the three Competitive Multiplayer modes—Incursion, Capture, and Meltdown—a look at the character progression systems, and most important of all, the system requirements.

The Minimum:

  • OS: Windows 7 x64-Bit or Later
  • CPU: Intel i5-750 / AMD Phenom IIx4 945
  • RAM: 6 GB
  • Hard Drive: 30 GB free
  • Video Memory: 1 GB
  • Minimum Required Video Card: AMD HD 6870/ NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 or better, PhysX support
  • Sound: DirectX 11
  • Input: Keyboard or dual-analog gameplay

The Recommended:

  • OS: Windows 7 x64-Bit or Later
  • CPU: Intel i5-750 / AMD Phenom IIx4 945
  • RAM: 6 GB
  • Hard Drive: 50 GB free
  • Video Memory: 2 GB
  • Recommended Video Card: AMD HD 7850/ NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 or better, PhysX support
  • Sound: DirectX 11
  • Input: Keyboard or dual-analog gamepad

Interestingly, Battleborn will support “general gamepads” and PS4 and Xbox One controllers at launch, but Steam controller support won’t be implemented until sometime after it comes out. It also won’t support 4K or “off-sized displays,” although Gearbox/2K are “actively investigating both.”

The blog post also includes a link to the Battleborn “prequel comic,” a multimedia extravaganza of exposition that sets the stage for the battle for the fate of the star Solus. The first part, Running the Numbers, is viewable now, while the second and third parts are “coming soon.” And that’s probably no lie: The Battleborn open beta begins on April 13, and the “series premiere” is set for May 3.

 

[Source:- PCgamer]

Support For Windows Server 2003 Ends Today

Not long ago, Microsoft ended support for one of the most widely used operating systems in history, Windows XP. Now, Microsoft has ended support for a product that impacted the server world almost as much as Windows XP impacted the PC world, Windows Server 2003.

Windows Server 2003 was based off of Windows XP, sharing the hybrid kernel design and many other features. The significantly increased support and stability of the OS relative to older Windows-based operating systems made it extremely popular, and made setting up a server easier. As a result, the OS is still used today.

For those who are still using Windows Server 2003, just as it is with XP, if you don’t switch to another system, then you will become increasingly vulnerable to hacks and exploits.

The end of Windows Server 2003 is bad for some Windows XP users, too. After the end of support for Windows XP, it was possible to hack the registry of your system so that Microsoft’s servers would think you are using a version of Windows Server 2003. This would allow you to get updates for Windows Server 2003. Because the two operating systems were so compatible with each other, a great deal of the updates would work for Windows XP, and it basically extended your support for a few more years.

Because Server 2003 is also losing support, though, this trick won’t work anymore. On the bright side, for those still on Windows XP, Windows 10 will be out soon, and there are several easy upgrade paths to get it. Just buy Windows 7 or Windows 8, and you can upgrade for free when it comes out.

For those with a server, Windows Server 2016 is being beta tested right now and should be out next year (and it’s based off of Windows 10).

 

[Source:- Tomsitpro]