ONEPLUS 3T: ALL THE PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS

OnePlus3T Silent

The OnePlus 3T has pretty much succeeded in taking over from its older brother, the OnePlus 3. Unfortunately, like every other smartphone on the market, these two devices have not been immune to software or hardware problems. Here we look at some of the main issues that have plagued the OnePlus 3T, and give you the details on the available solutions (at least when there are available solutions!).

Deactivating GPS and rotation

Every time you activate the power saving mode on the OnePlus 3T, your GPS and rotation mode are immediately disabled. This is a problem, and sadly there are currently no solutions which will resolve the issue. For the moment, the only thing you can do is reactivate these options manually after they have been disabled.

Play Store

Have you tried to download an app whilst roaming only to find it doesn’t work? OnePlus is aware of the problem, and claims that you can resolve this by following these instructions on Google Play Help and/or activating the power saving mode and resetting the Play Store options.

There is a chance that AVG AntiVirus, Paytm or Truecaller apps may block the download. You can get around this by disabling them before you download.

Contact display

Looking to call one of your contacts and noticed they are listed twice in your list? This is a known bug that (for the moment) has no solution.

Vibrate mode

Some users have been having some issues activating the vibrate mode on their devices. No need to panic, OnePlus hasn’t removed this function but it is not particularly easy to find on Android Nougat.

When you switch to silent (with the notifications button), a notifications window appears at the top. On the end of the right hand-side you’ll see the settings gear icon; press on this and you will be given other options. Select the “Enable vibration” option and your worries will be over.

 

[Source:- AP]

Once upon a Vine: The final Vines are some heartfelt good-byes

Vine stars shared some touching farewell messages in the final moments of the platform's existence.

The time has come: Tuesday marks the end of Vine as we know it.

As the app transforms into Vine Camera, leaving those punchy 6-second videos behind, many of its biggest stars and fans are sharing one last good-bye.

There were heartfelt words, sometimes tears and, as always, a lot of laughs.

Top Viners like Thomas Sanders and Liza Koshy thanked the app for the ways it’s changed their lives.

 
[Source:- Mashable]

 

 

The SIM-unlocked Alcatel IDOL 4S quietly goes on sale through the Microsoft Store

Image result for The SIM-unlocked Alcatel IDOL 4S quietly goes on sale through the Microsoft Store

Looks like speculation that Alcatel’s Idol 4S running Windows 10 Mobile going carrier-unlocked (GSM) after a T-Mobile exclusivity ended were true. As spotted on MSPU Microsoft has begun to make the rather powerful – and impressive – Windows 10 Mobile phone available for purchase in the US through their store.

Asking price is still the same $470, which includes the VR goggle package and 21MP rear camera.

Alcatel Idol 4S with Windows 10 Specs

CPU Snapdragon 820 | Quad Core CPU @2.15 GHz
Display 5.5-inch FHD AMOLED
Dragontrail 2.5D Glass
Memory 64GB ROM
4GB RAM
microSD
Camera 21 MP rear camera
8 MP front-facing camera
Battery 3,000 mAh
Quick Charge 3.0
420Hrs Standby
15Hrs Talk
Continuum Yes
VR Yes
Windows Hello Yes (Fingerprint)
Audio Dual speakers with Hi-Fi surround sound
Dimensions 153.9 x 75.4 x 6.99 mm
Weight 152g
HD Voice Yes
VoLTE Yes
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac
Wi-Fi Calling 1.0
Bluetooth BT 4.1
A2DP, OPP, HFP, AVRCP, PBAP

The rest of the specifications and color (‘Halo Gold’) are all the same as well. In fact, it’s likely the same device as our review unit, which was unlocked as well and worked brilliantly on AT&T with no issue.

Microsoft notes that the unlocked version should work on AT&T, T-Mobile, H20, Straight Talk, Cricket Wireless, MetroPCS, and select prepaid carriers.

 

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

 

FACEBOOK IS PLANNING TO BET BIG ON VR IN THE NEXT DECADE

ANDROIDPIT VR glasses 2

The lawsuit

Oculus is facing a $2 billion lawsuit from ZeniMax over the creation of the technology that went into their VR headset. ZeniMax is a game publisher, and while you may not have heard of them, you may have heard of some of their games, like Fallout or Elder Scrolls. Some parts of this technology may have come from a former employee of the game publisher, and ZeniMax was never compensated for it. Zuckerberg went to the trial yesterday to testify for Oculus, which Facebook had acquired back in March 2014 for $2 billion plus another $1 billion more for milestones and employee retention. Zuckerberg, of course, denied the accusations and issued this sick burn after being asked by a ZeniMax lawyer about his reaction to the suit:

“It is pretty common when you announce a big deal or do something that all kinds of people just kind of come out of the woodwork and claim that they just own some portion of the deal. Like most people in the court, I’ve never even heard of ZeniMax before.”

Zuckerberg’s vision for VR

Zuckerberg gave us some strong hints about his vision for VR during the trial, and it seems to me that his plan for the technology involves three key components:

1. Improve quality of the VR experience

While he doesn’t think that “good virtual reality is fully there yet,” he does seem hopeful for the future, and more importantly, seems like he has a plan. He projected it would take five to 10 more years of development in order to “get to where we all want to go.”

2. Commit to long-term efforts

But, why will it take so long? He said, “These things end up being more complex than you think up front.” So it seems that the company knows it will have to make a larger long-term investment to reach its technical and adoption goals than it had initially planned.

3. Make a large monetary investment

Zuckerberg said during the trial that Facebook will probably have to invest over $3 billion in the next 10 years in order to give hundreds of millions of people a good virtual reality experience, which is the primary goal.

 

[Source:- AP]

 

Kantar’s latest smartphone market share report sees Windows Phone dip below 1% in the U.S.

Kantar has released its monthly report on the smartphone market for the three months ending in November 2016, and things continue to look down for Windows Phone. Compared to the same period in 2015, Windows Phone’s share of the market decreased across the board. Perhaps most notably, Windows Phone’s share of the U.S. market in particular dipped below 1%, dropping to a 0.8% share from 2.3% during the same period the year prior.

Kantar reports that the biggest drops occurred in Great Britain and Italy, which saw declines of 7% and 5.2%, respectively. Meanwhile the 5 European countries tallied together ended up seeing an overall decrease of 4.1% compared to the same period a year ago.

Windows Phone has been on a steady decline for a while now, and that’s likely to continue as Microsoft winds down its Lumia production and switches focus to whatever the next big thing could be.

If you’re interested in more, you can check out Kantar’s full report, and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

 

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

Nintendo Switch’s First TV Commercial Features The Legend of Zelda

Nintendo Switch’s First TV Commercial Features The Legend of Zelda

Nintendo’s first commercial for the Nintendo Switch highlights both the portability of the console and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, one of its launch titles.

Nintendo has just released the first television commercial for the Nintendo Switch, and the 30 second video unsurprisingly focuses on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, its strongest launch day title. The video also features a healthy split of focus between both showing off the console’s portability, and displaying some snazzy gameplay footage courtesy of Breath of the Wild.

It’s no surprise that Nintendo would choose to focus on one of their most exciting Nintendo Switch titles of 2017 for the company’s first foray into Nintendo Switch television advertisements, as other more high profile titles like Super Mario Odyssey and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe won’t be arriving till further after the console’s launch. As it currently stands, Breath of the Wild is the de facto launch day attraction, sharing the launch day roster with just 4 other titles.

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a good choice to give the masses for their first look at the Nintendo Switch, though the title itself isn’t exclusive to the console. Nintendo has promised that the game will arrive for the Wii U on the same day, and failure to deliver on that would upset a lot of Wii U-based fans. While the gameplay will be completely the same for both consoles, Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma stated that the Nintendo Switch would feature faster load times and a higher resolution. However, when stored locally the game will take up half the space of the Nintendo Switch’s entire HDD, which means many Nintendo gamers will likely be expanding this storage with SDXC cards.

Nintendo revealed in a recent Switch Presentation that the console would sport between a 2.5 to 6 hours of battery life depending on what is being run on the console, so whether gamers could feasibly take the device from home, onto a public bus, and then onto a flight in one go remains to be tested. That being said, the guy in the commercial didn’t take any luggage with him, so it was probably a short trip.

In any event, the Nintendo Switch is certainly more portable than its rival consoles, although the facts revealed at the presentation weren’t enough to prevent Nintendo’s stocks from falling after the event concluded.

What do you think about the Nintendo Switch, Ranters? Does the commercial do a good job in showing off both the console and Breath of the Wild?

The Nintendo Switch will release on March 3, 2017, alongside The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

 

[Source:- GR]

 

Do you use mobile payments? [Poll of the Week]

Last week’s poll summary: Out of over 1,800 total votes, 32.3% of our readers said their favorite announcement from CES 2017 was the new ASUS ZenFone AR. 13.3% said they were most excited for Samsung’s Chromebook Plus & Pro, while 11.7% said their favorite announcement was the Faraday Future FF91.

Mobile payments have been around for a pretty long time now, but they didn’t start catching on until the release of Apple Pay and Android Pay a few years ago.

While Google, of course, wants all Android users to use Android Pay, Samsung wants its users to use Samsung Pay, and the same goes for Apple with Apple Pay. And if for some reason you aren’t fully satisfied with those three options, we have access to plenty more mobile payment services to round out the already crowded landscape. Chase Bank and even Walmart have their own proprietary services, for example.

Whichever service you decide to use, though, mobile payments are designed to make your life easier and save you time.

So tell us – do you use mobile payments, or are you still not convinced they save time and effort? Be sure to cast your vote in the poll attached below, and speak up in the comments if you have anything else to add. We look forward to hearing what you have to say!

[Source:- Androidauthority]

 

Could this be the Surface Phone? Microsoft awarded patents for a range of foldable mobile devices

Microsoft has been awarded a patent for a foldable mobile devices and other components that could point to something beyond a mere prototype.

I should preface this by saying that patents don’t mean products. This could simply be Microsoft’s way of protecting future ideas or prototypes that are simply too costly or problematic to ever see production. Still, it offers a tantalizing glimpse of what could be on the horizon.

A new patent granted to Microsoft last week shows dual and triple-hinged devices that support multiple configurations. They can be folded into something small and phone-like, placed in a “tent” mode, and even folded out to create a larger tablet. If this is Microsoft’s vision for the Surface Phone, it will have very few comparable devices on the market, and certainly fits the Surface modus operandi of bringing something totally unique to existing form factors.

The patent’s various configurations reveal double, and even triple-screened phones, that the patent describes as both a mini-tablet and a phone. The devices, which also include slide-out models that appear to include different types of housings, are described as supporting several use cases given the varied configurations possible as a result of their hinges.

It’s particularly interesting, as Microsoft was also recently awarded a patent for an electrical hinge that would naturally be essential in any and, perhaps even all of these designs.

Patent filings don’t always translate into products for market, but these recent developments are especially intriguing. Microsoft has long been teasing spiritually Surface-like mobile devices, and those devices, hopefully, are just around the corner.

 

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]

 

What is the BBC micro:bit – Gary explains

microbit_pinout

The BBC micro:bit is part of an initiative to get kids coding, primarily in the UK, however its influence is starting to spread world wide. The micro:bit itself is a small credit card sized computer with an ARM Cortex-M0 microprocessor on it, plus a variety of sensors and LEDS. You can program it via MicroPython, JavaScript, a visual blocks editor, or in the C programming language. It is cheap, child friendly and has been given free to every child in year 7 or equivalent across the UK. So regardless of your age, if you find the prospect of learning to code interesting then read on to find out more in my full review of the BBC micro:bit.

History

There is a whole generation of computer scientists, software engineers, coders and hackers who first got into computing due to the home computer revolution of the mid-1980s and early 1990s. Machines such as the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, the Commodore 64 and the BBC Micro became the entry point for whole swathes of young people to learn about computing. Unfortunately as we entered the era of the PC and game consoles the “roll up your sleeves” attitude of the home computer revolution started to fade and in turn universities started to see a drop in the number of applications for computer science related studies.

This decline has been partly addressed by the great work of the Raspberry Pi foundation and now by the work of the Micro:bit foundation. You may have noticed the similarities between the name of the 1980s BBC Micro and the new BBC micro:bit. That is of course intentional. The British Broadcasting Corporation was a major partner in the release and the original BBC Micro and now the corporation is playing a significant role with the launch of the new micro:bit.

The micro:bit

The micro:bit itself measures 4 x 5 cm and includes 25 LEDs, 2 programmable switches, Bluetooth, an accelerometer, a compass, 5 ring type connectors and a 23-pin edge connector. This makes it ideal for not only learning about software but also for learning the fundamentals of electronics. The board can be programmed in a number of different ways including in Python and using JavaScript. The board is actually based on ARM’s mbed OS platform and the various programming environments offer higher level programming access. However the fundamental principle is the same: you write a program, compile it and then flash it onto the board. Once programmed the software on the board remains in the flash memory and will run whenever the board is powered on. This means that you can make standalone projects which just run whenever you power up the micro:bit.

 

Blocks

Probably the easiest introduction to coding for the micro:bit is using Microsoft’s micro:bit Programming Experience Toolkit (PXT). It supports both block-based coding and JavaScript. If you haven’t seen block-based coding before, the premise is very simple. The programmer uses drag-and-drop to pick blocks from a predefined set and stitch them together to make a program. Maybe picture will help:

 

On the left is a micro:bit emulator which demonstrates how the program will run on a real micro:bit. On the right is the program. There is a forever loop with two blocks inside of it. The first tells the micro:bit to scroll the message “Android Authority rulez!” and the second tells the micro:bit to pause for 1 second after the message has finished. Then the program will loop back and do it all again.

To add a new block you click on one of the menu items in the middle and then drag the desired block from the palette. The program in the screenshot above is for a very simple dice program (or should I say “die” as it is singular) that will display a random number between 1 and 6 when someone shakes the micro:bit.

There are blocks for controlling the LED matrix including showing strings, numbers and user-defined images. There are also blocks for reading the inputs like the compass and the accelerometer, plus blocks for all the normal programming stuff like conditions, loops, variables and simple arithmetic. On top of all that there are also blocks for controlling the input/output pins and even a way to do peer-to-peer communications using Bluetooth.

When you plug the micro:bit into your PC it will appear as a USB flash drive, called “MICROBIT.” To flash a blocks program onto the micro:bit you hit the download button and then drag-and-drop the resulting “.hex” file onto the MICROBIT drive. The micro:bit will automatically start the flashing process and then reboot when completed.

JavaScript

Microsoft’s micro:bit PXT also doubles as a Javascript editor. All block programs can be shown as JavaScript, in fact the block editor is just a front end to a JavaScript generator. If you modify the JavaScript the IDE will attempt to convert it back to blocks, however if it is too complex it won’t work and you need to continue in JavaScript only.

 

What this means is that if you are familiar with JavaScript, maybe because you have done some web development or maybe because you have used some of the popular JavaScript frameworks, then you can jump straight into micro:bit programming with little effort. It also means that if you have little or no programming skills then you can start to learn JavaScript using the micro:bit and you can use the blocks editor to help you get started. In either case it is a win-win situation!

Microsoft’s PXT editor isn’t the only way to write JavaScript for the micro:bit, you can also use the Code Kingdoms editor. Similar to Microsoft’s offering you can use blocks and JavaScript and switch between the two.

 

The only problem with the JavaScript approach is that the frameworks used by the two editors aren’t compatible. For example, to pause for 0.5 seconds under PXT you would use basic.pause(500) but under Code Kingdom’s IDE you need to use wait(500). The same thing applies to all the API calls related to the micro:bit including controlling the LED matrix, reading the button inputs, picking random numbers and even how to respond to events like shake.

This incompatibility will certainly be confusing to anyone just starting out and could cause frustration if an inexperienced user tries to switch from one environment to the other.

MicroPython

Python is a very popular high-level programming language that is often used to teach programming as it is simpler than languages like C and C++. MicroPython is a lean version of Python specifically designed to run on microcontrollers (like the ARM Cortex-M0 on the micro:bit).

There are several ways to code in Python on the micro:bit. One is to use the web-based IDE on the official micro:bit website, another is to use an offline editor like Mu. Mu is itself written in Python and works on Windows, OS X, Linux and Raspberry Pi. It is designed specifically for the micro:bit and also includes a built-in flash tool. Like the blocks editors and the JavaScript implementations, MicroPython for the micro:bit includes an API for controlling the hardware like the LED matrix and reading the inputs like the buttons.

 

C

mbed OS is ARM’s open source microcontroller development platform. It allows developers to build microcontroller based solutions using C and C++. The platform also includes everything you need to build IoT products and has a full networking stack along with support for Bluetooth. The micro:bit is in fact a mbed OS product, so while it is designed to be used by the higher level programming languages like JavaScript and Python, you can in fact program it via mbed in C and C++.

To program a micro:bit from mbed you first need to add the board to your setup and then import the micro:bit library into your project. From there you have access to some very low level classes and functions which provide a similar API to that of JavaScript and MicroPython. In fact if you study the mbed OS API you will see lots of similarities between what is available in the higher level languages and what is provided in the support library.

The screenshot above shows how to write the dice program in C++. As you can see it is a little longer than say the JavaScript version as you need to do more setup and handle things at a slightly lower level. This probably isn’t the best place for beginners to learn about the micro:bit. However if you have some C/C++ experience then this is a great way to explore the nitty-gritty of the platform.

Wrap-up

There is no doubt that the micro:bit is a excellent learning tool. It takes a different approach than the Raspberry Pi (which is also an excellent way to get into programming) since it doesn’t need a keyboard, mouse or monitor to use it. However you will need access to a PC for the coding and flashing. Well, actually that isn’t strictly true. It is possible to program the micro:bit from a smartphone or tablet. There are micro:bit apps available for Android and iOS. These apps basically take the place of the PC for the flashing process, which is done over Bluetooth rather than over a USB cable. However the programming environment offered within the app are actually just links to the online web environments.

The aim of the micro:bit is to encourage creativity in terms of software and hardware among young people and it certainly does just that. My kids are keen to play around with the micro:bit (now that the review is done) and I think that because the LED matrix is simpler to program than say sprites in a game on something like the Raspberry Pi then entry point is lower (which is a good thing).

If you are thinking about getting a young person a present which might actually be educational rather than just provide amusement, then you should certainly think about the micro:bit.

 

 
[Source:- Androidauthority]

The SIM-unlocked Alcatel IDOL 4S quietly goes on sale through the Microsoft Store

Image result for The SIM-unlocked Alcatel IDOL 4S quietly goes on sale through the Microsoft Store

Looks like speculation that Alcatel’s Idol 4S running Windows 10 Mobile going carrier-unlocked (GSM) after a T-Mobile exclusivity ended were true. As spotted on MSPU Microsoft has begun to make the rather powerful – and impressive – Windows 10 Mobile phone available for purchase in the US through their store.

Asking price is still the same $470, which includes the VR goggle package and 21MP rear camera.

Alcatel Idol 4S with Windows 10 Specs

CPU Snapdragon 820 | Quad Core CPU @2.15 GHz
Display 5.5-inch FHD AMOLED
Dragontrail 2.5D Glass
Memory 64GB ROM
4GB RAM
microSD
Camera 21 MP rear camera
8 MP front-facing camera
Battery 3,000 mAh
Quick Charge 3.0
420Hrs Standby
15Hrs Talk
Continuum Yes
VR Yes
Windows Hello Yes (Fingerprint)
Audio Dual speakers with Hi-Fi surround sound
Dimensions 153.9 x 75.4 x 6.99 mm
Weight 152g
HD Voice Yes
VoLTE Yes
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac
Wi-Fi Calling 1.0
Bluetooth BT 4.1
A2DP, OPP, HFP, AVRCP, PBAP

The rest of the specifications and color (‘Halo Gold’) are all the same as well. In fact, it’s likely the same device as our review unit, which was unlocked as well and worked brilliantly on AT&T with no issue.

Microsoft notes that the unlocked version should work on AT&T, T-Mobile, H20, Straight Talk, Cricket Wireless, MetroPCS, and select prepaid carriers.

Supporting Continuum, VR, and a handy fingerprint reader the Idol 4S is also one of the slimmest and nicest looking Windows phones we have seen.

In my full review of the Idol 4S, I had nothing but outstanding things to say about the hardware, design, execution, and price. While the Windows 10 Mobile ecosystem and app situation are well known and the Idol 4s’s camera pales to a high-end Lumia, it is still the best option for the Microsoft fan who see little value in going to iOS and Android.

 

[Source:- Windowscentral]