ANTIVIRUS FOR ANDROID HAS A LONG, LONG WAY TO GO

ANTIVIRUS PROGRAMS ON PCs have a mixed track record. While generally useful, they still have to play catch-up with evolving threats–and their deep system access has on occasion enabled even worse attacks. Now, as antivirus products gain in popularity for Android devices, they appear to be making many of the same old mistakes.

A key part of the current shortcomings stems from relative immaturity in Android antivirus offerings. Researchers at Georgia Tech who analyzed 58 mainstream options found that many were relatively easy to defeat, often because didn’t take a nuanced and diverse approach to malware detection. Taking on the mindset of an attacker, the researchers built a tool called AVPass that works to smuggle malware into a system without being detected by antivirus. Of the 58 programs AVPass tested, only two–from AhnLab and WhiteArmor–consistently stopped AVPass attacks.

“Antivirus for the mobile platform is really just starting for some companies—a lot of the antivirus for Android may even be their first iteration,” says Max Wolotsky, a PhD student at Georgia Tech who worked on the research. “We would definitely warn consumers that they should look into more than just AV. You want to be cautious.”

Modern antivirus uses machine-learning techniques to evolve with the malware field. So in creating AVPass, the researchers started by developing methods for defeating defensive algorithms they could access (like those created for academic research or other open-source projects) and then used these strategies as the basis for working out attacks against proprietary consumer antivirus—products where you can’t see the code powering them. The team will present on and release AVPass at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas on Thursday.

Free Pass

To test the 58 Android antivirus products and figure out what bypasses would work against each of them, the researchers used a service called VirusTotal, which attempts to identify links and malware samples by scanning them through a system that incorporates dozens of tools, and offering results about what each tool found. By querying VirusTotal with different malware components and seeing which tools flagged which samples, the researchers were able to form a picture of the type of detection features each antivirus has. Under an academic license, VirusTotal limited the group to fewer than 300 queries per malware sample, but the researchers say even this small number was adequate for gathering data on how the different services go about detecting malware.

[Source”timesofindia”]

Use of social media sites surges globally with Facebook way out in front

Facebook is far and away the most popular social network worldwide. Nearly 1.50 billion people will log in to the platform in 2017, accounting for 60.8 per cent of all social media users

One-third of the global population will be using social media platforms on a regular basis by the end of the year, according to a new study.

This equates to more than 2.4 billion people, and is a 8.2 per cent on the number of social media users recorded in 2016.

The eMarketer forecast indicates that at least 71 per cent of internet users worldwide will access social media sites with China alone accounting for over 46 per cent of users. By 2021, social network penetration will expand to 73.1 per cent globally.

The number of people accessing social media platforms via mobile continues to rise, growing by an estimated 10.7 per cent this year to reach 2.01 billion. This is equivalent to four in five social network users.

Facebook is far and away the most popular social network worldwide. Nearly 1.50 billion people will log in to the platform in 2017, accounting for 60.8 per cent of all social media users. Approximately 87.2 per cent of Facebook users will access the site via a mobile device.

According to eMarketer, more than 260 million people worldwide will use Twitter regularly this year, an increase of 4 from 2016. However, while Twitter’s audience is growing, it continues to feel pressure from competing social platforms.

The result of this is that the share of social network users worldwide who use the platform will contract from 11 per cent last year to 10.6 per cent in 2017.

The survey reveals that Twitter accounts for 10.6 per cent of all social network users.

More than eight in 10 internet users in China, or 626 million people, will access social networks regularly in 2017, with homegrown messaging platform WeChat fuelling takeup.

“Social networks as a whole continue to grow, increasingly resembling new internet users by accessing almost exclusively via mobile devices and gradually adding older users to their ranks,” said Monica Peart, senior forecasting director at eMarketer.

 

[Source”timesofindia”]

Capitalism the Apple Way vs. Capitalism the Google Way

While lots of attention is directed toward identifying the next great start-up, the defining tech-industry story of the last decade has been the rise of Apple and Google. In terms of wealth creation, there is no comparison. Eight years ago, neither one of them was even in the top 10 most valuable companies in the world, and their combined market value was less than $300 billion. Now, Apple and Alphabet (Google’s parent company) have become the two most valuable companies, with a combined market capitalization of over $1.3 trillion. And increasingly, these two behemoths are starting to collide in various markets, from smartphones to home-audio devices to, according to speculation, automobiles.

But the greatest collision between Apple and Google is little noticed. The companies have taken completely different approaches to their shareholders and to the future, one willing to accede to the demands of investors and the other keeping power in the hands of founders and executives. These rival approaches are about something much bigger than just two of the most important companies in the world; they embody two alternative models of capitalism, and the one that wins out will shape the future of the economy.

Story image for Apple from The Atlantic
In the spring of 2012, Toni Sacconaghi, a respected equity-research analyst, released a report that contemplated a radical move for Apple. He, along with other analysts, had repeatedly been pushing Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, to consider returning some of Apple’s stockpile of cash, which approached $100 billion by the end of 2011, to shareholders. Cook, and Steve Jobs before him, had resisted similar calls so that the company could, in the words of Jobs, “keep their powder dry” and take advantage of “more strategic opportunities in the future.”

But there was another reason Apple wouldn’t so readily part with this cash: The majority of it was in Ireland because of the company’s fortuitous creation of Apple Operations International in Ireland in 1980Since then, the vast majority of Apple’s non-U.S. profits had found their way to the country, and tapping into that cash would mean incurring significant U.S. taxes due upon repatriation to American soil. So Sacconaghi floated a bold idea: Apple should borrow the $100 billion in the U.S., and then pay it out to shareholders in the form of dividends and share buybacks. The unusual nature of the proposal attracted attention among financiers and served Sacconaghi’s presumed purpose, ratcheting up the pressure on Cook. A week later, Apple relented and announced plans to begin releasing cash via dividends.

The results of Sacconaghi’s report were not lost on Silicon Valley, and Google responded three weeks later. At the time, the share structure that the company put in place when it went public in 2004 was becoming fragile. This original arrangement allowed Google’s founders to maintain voting control over the company, even as their share of ownership shrunk as more shares were issued. The explicit premise was that this structure would “protect Google from outside pressures and the temptation to sacrifice future opportunities to meet short-term demands.”

[Source”indianexpress”]

The simple way to get better at design

featured_feedback

Design, by its very nature, is there to be judged. We do it every day—whether it’s our own creation, or that of someone else. When we see something, we’re looking at it and forming an opinion (positive or negative).

So, those of us who do this type of work for a living do understand that it’s all part of the gig. Clients will of course give their opinions about what we have created for them. Our job is generally two-fold:

  • Communicate with the client as to why we made specific design choices and back up our methods with supporting evidence. For example, perhaps a client doesn’t like the placement of a search field. You might point out that you placed it in that particular spot as research shows more users will utilize the feature.
  • Make sure you’ve done your best to ensure the client’s happiness with your work. Whether they come around to your way of thinking or not, you still need to put forth your best effort to help them achieve their goal.

There’s a certain amount of give-and-take in the design process when working with a client. But that’s to be expected when you’ve been hired by someone to represent their brand.

However, in recent times, designers have also become subject to another kind of criticism: one they voluntarily sign up for.

PUTTING YOUR WORK ON DISPLAY FOR THE DESIGN COMMUNITY

Beyond the usual client feedback, there are “community critique” websites. Many designers are choosing to submit their work to sites like Behance or Awwwards – places where the community at large (and a jury in the case of Awwwards) can offer both critique and some creative inspiration.

Both communities, although a bit different in methodology, are quite popular. Behance is run by Adobe and is completely free to use. Besides websites, they also feature varied types of media such as photography, architecture and fashion. You can upload your work via their site or directly from Photoshop CC. Community members can vote up and comment on submitted works, while Behance curators create featured galleries showing the best of the best.

 

[Source:- webdesignerdepot]

 

New fifth-gen Apple TV 2016 release date & features rumours: ‘Something bigger’ on the way for Apple TV, says Tim Cook | Apple TV 5 launch rumoured for late 2016

New Apple TV release date & new features rumours

When will Apple release the next Apple TV – the fifth-generation Apple TV – in the UK? And what new features, tech specs and design changes should we expect from the new 5G Apple TV for 2016 or 2017?

The fourth-gen Apple TV – the first Apple TV device to allow users to install apps – was unveiled by Apple at the iPhone 6s launch event on 9 September 2015, and went onsale weeks later. Nearly a year later, we’re looking ahead to the launch of the next, fifth-gen (5G) Apple TV. Indeed, there are already rumours that a next-generation Apple TV might arrive in late 2016, although Apple could also be waiting until next year to release a special 10th-anniversary model.

In this article we gather all the evidence related to the fifth-gen Apple TV’s launch date, as well as reporting on all the rumours and clues about the 2016 Apple TV’s new features, tech specs and design changes. However, if you’re (understandably) still interested in the Apple TV that’s available right now, we’ve got plenty of information about the 2015 Apple TV, including pricing and the best places to buy.

Updated, 27 July 2016, to discuss Tim Cook’s enigmatic comments about the future of the Apple TV at Apple’s Q3 financial results call.

New Apple TV 2016 release date rumours: When will Apple release the 5th-gen Apple TV?

Our money is on autumn 2016, although Apple may choose to hold it back until the start of 2017 and make more of the product’s 10th anniversary.

Here’s when the four generations of Apple TV launched:

  • 1st-gen Apple TV: January 2007
  • 2nd-gen Apple TV: September 2010
  • 3rd-gen Apple TV: March 2012
  • 4th-gen Apple TV: September 2015

Evidently, Apple updates its Apple TV less often than its iPhones, iPads and Macs: there was a three-and-a-half-year wait between the first and second models, and between the third and fourth. Based on that, it would be reasonable to expect the 5G Apple TV to appear in 2018 or even 2019, and we certainly don’t have firm evidence to dispute that.

But our instincts tell us that the Apple TV’s position and status in the company’s portfolio of products has changed. It used to be a sideline and a hobby, but with the growing importance of streaming media and smart-home applications, and with the arrival on the platform of games and its own App Store, Apple TV is moving to centre stage.

And we’re not the only ones to think Apple is likely to start updating the TV more frequently from now on.

A report (link for subscribers only) in DigiTimes last year predicted that the fifth-generation Apple TV would go into trial production as early as December 2015, with volume production starting in the first quarter of 2016. Changes were said to include a dramatically improved hardware performance and new functions “to help it no longer serve only as a set-top box”.

Q3 2016 earnings call comments: ‘Something bigger’ on the way

Tim Cook made some non-specific but intriguing comments about the future of the Apple TV at Apple’s Q3 2016 earnings conference call. He made it very clear that Apple has big plans for its TV division, and plans to build “something bigger” with the product and surrounding ecosystem.

Near the end of the hour-long call, a question was posed by Kulbinder Garcha, the managing director of Credit Suisse:

“I think about some of the comments you’ve made about the TV market and how it’s been stuck in the sixties and seventies, and the experience hasn’t changed,” Garcha said. “I understand that you’ve got the Apple TV box out, but in terms of driving actual video-on-demand services, is that something Apple wants to do themselves, do you want to partner, could you even build content? How do you think about that as an actual business opportunity, as opposed to, here’s an Apple box and we sell some units but it’s not that meaningful to the overall company in terms of size?”

Tim Cook’s reply was enigmatic.

“The introduction of Apple TV and tvOS in last October and the subsequent OS releases and what’s coming out this fall… think of that as building the foundation for what we believe can be a broader business over time,” he said.

“I don’t want to be more precise than that but you shouldn’t look at what’s there today and think we’ve done what we want to do. We’ve built a foundation that we can do something bigger off of.”

New Apple TV release date: WWDC 2016 and tvOS 10

Back in spring we argued that the 5G Apple TV was unlikely to be launched at WWDC 2016, since the event came round less than a year after Apple rolled out the fourth-gen model and none of the previous Apple TVs had launched in summer. Indeed, Apple launched no new hardware at the event whatsoever. But the new version of the Apple TV’s operating system, tvOS 10, got considerable stage time. As we often observe when discussing new iPhones and iPads, many of the most significant updates come not from new hardware but from free software updates.

Siri gets some big improvements in tvOS’s new update: it can now search the Apple TV’s movie and TV database with more complex queries. It can search YouTube, too, and any live streaming channels can be launched by saying “watch” and then the name of the channel. There’s a new dark mode for Apple TV, which makes the background black instead of the bright white we’re used to. And the Apple TV Remote app has been redesigned; it now offers all the Siri remote features and can be used for Siri queries using the built-in mic.

(Speaking of the Remote app, did you know that there’s a SiriMote app that’s been designed to let you control your Mac with an Apple TV Siri Remote? You’ll be able to use the app and Siri Remote together to control playback on your Mac, but accordingto Apple Insider the setup is difficult. The app is free and works with El Capitan. You can download it from Eternal Storms at eternalstorms.at.)

One last thing Apple didn’t mention, but has since come to light in Apple support documents, is that the requirement for Siri Remote compatibility for Apple TV games has been relaxed. That means they can focus on MFi game controllers, which are much more game-friendly than the Siri remote. See: Best Apple TV game controllers.

Read our Complete guide to tvOS’s new features for more information on the software update.

New Apple TV release date: 10th-anniversary Apple TV

Looking again at those launch dates above, we feel like the looming tenth anniversary of the Apple TV might be a tempting occasion for a big update. Apple tends to dislike historical wallowing – famously refusing to build a museum in its new headquarters because “we’re focused on the future, not the past” – but there is a precendent for an anniversary product in the form of the Twentieth Anniversary Mac (number 4 in our article The 5 weirdest Macs of all time).

 

[Source: Macworld]

Microsoft’s growth mindset is changing the way its products are sold

Microsoft fans all across the world very much well know Microsoft’s mission statement: to “empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.” Very much so, it appears now that this mission statement and growth mindset has also left an impact on the Redmond giant’s products and sales strategies.

Judson Altoff, President of Microsoft North America, was one of the speakers atEnvision 2016’s conference, and at the event, he remarked to Envision Attendees on a change at the sales force at Microsoft. As per remarks published on ZDnet, Altoff mentioned that Microsoft has been learning to eliminate the separation between how they are traditionally market sold, and serviced. He also detailed that Microsoft is selling more and more of its products as subscription services and that the sales team needs to go beyond just selling a customer on something one time.  In addition, he also remarked that Microsoft is moving the focus off of the technology alone, and more towards how customers can and should use the technology.

“Your focus needs to be on who’s actually figured out how to attach more Xbox controllers and games to every console sale? Who’s actually figured out how to sell their customers machine learning and data science projects running on Azure? Who’s actually figured out how to get customers to see value out of the increase utilization of Skype for Business and greater connectedness and collaboration on your environments,” Altoff said.

Additional comments from Altoff published in ZDnet also appear to suggest that Microsoft has been empowering its fans, via “fan creation.” Altoff is quoted as saying,

“Happy product advocates trump indifferent users. Sales needs to make sure that customers aren’t just using their products, but they’re actually happy about doing so because they’re getting value out of it.”

The comments from Altoff are together very interesting and seem to show that Microsoft has been taking steps to making overall changes to better live up to its goal of empowering the planet. We would love to hear your thoughts on these comments, so please drop us a comment below and sound off on the situation!

 

 

[Source:- Winbeta]